Beautiful Camping then the Best Laid Plans….

The publishing delay has ended. My blog is back!

On Memorial Day weekend we camped on our friends’ property in Plumas County. After so much snow this winter it was very green with lots of wildflowers.It was a relaxing weekend, with fun activities thrown in.Andy and Stan rode dirt bikes.

Jim and Peggie rode mountain bikes.Jim played music.And so did Steve and Gary.

Alice, our host, with Timmy 

Chuck, also host relaxing in camp. Many of us got a lot of reading done too.

Our motor home in the early morning light.

A pond that appeared after the big snow winter was fun for throwing rocks into.Peggie and I took a hike to see the wildflowers and all the green. We saw a couple of snow flowers.

It was very green, greener than most years.

Then we saw Andy riding by,followed by Stan.

Some of the beauty we saw.

We also hung out at Steve and Dianne’s cabin down the road.

Ian watching inquisitive Adi, his son.

Dianne with her grandson, Adi.

Ian playing his dad’s guitar, with dad Steve at his side.

We even got to have a fire, the first in many years. It was finally wet enough that the fire wasn’t going to risk starting a wild fire. My camera obviously focused on the flame.

All in all a weekend with good friends, good food (as I was told), and good relaxing and fun.

In the week that followed I got confirmation that I have the C9orf72 gene mutation that causes ALS – no surprise, considering that my mom had been confirmed to have it too. This now allows me to participate in research specifically for this gene mutation. This is what I feel I can do for my son and my niece and nephews and cousins. The researchers want to first see what the different forms of the mutation do to the outcome of the disease. Some people get ALS, some people get Frontal Temporal Dementia (FTD), and some people get both. There are also people with the mutation that get no disease at all. My family has a long history of dementia also. Getting the genetic confirmation has put into motion my enrollment in two studies, one in Los Angeles and one in San Francisco. It is exciting to be involved in research that could lead to a cure for this particular genetic form of the disease. The gene is dominant, meaning that offspring have 50% chance of inheriting the mutated gene.

On Wednesday, Andy had his Spring Orchestra Concert at school.Andy with his proud parents after the concert.

On Thursday, Andy stayed home from school, after throwing up in the middle of the night and most of the day. It was unfortunate timing – the week before final exams. He did go to school Friday, and Stan and I drove to San Francisco.

On Friday, I had my second botox injections in my parietal saliva glands. I had noticed the effect drop off in the last few weeks. The first dose did let me cut the dose of the saliva reducing medicine in half. This time they did a higher dose and both upper and lower part of the glands. As I write this I am already noticing that I can cut my dose of the medicine even more. 

Next came my ALS clinic visit. I first met with the speech therapist. She gave me some exercises to keep my TMJ muscles flexible so I can keep my mouth closed without effort. Then I met with nutrition and they were very happy that I am maintining my weight. I met with the respiratory therapist and she shared the results of my overnight pulse ox test, which were disconcerting. The results show that I am desatting (blood oxygen levels getting dangerously low) several times while sleeping, so much so that I am not getting any REM sleep. I do wake up a lot. No wonder I have had so much fatigue. I use a bipap, and this resulted in an order to increase my bipap pressures. We also found that I have vocal cord involvement impeding my forced vital capacity breathing tests. Air does not flow smoothly when I am making an effort. I met with Physical Therapy and my neurologist, this time Dr. Catherine Lomen-Hoerth, the director of the ALS clinic. There is no sign of progression to my limbs yet. Dr. Lomen-Hoerth hooked me up with the UCSF folks researching the C9orf72 gene mutation.

All in all, it was a good clinic visit. My disease is progressing, and I am uncomfortable at times (needing cough assist or dealing with saliva issues) but I still feel incredibly lucky to be able to self care this long.

We finished at the clinic at about 5 P.M. and we walked to dinner about 5 blocks to a brew pub called Social. We had big plans for the weekend ahead. Our son Andy had driven to the Sacramento area after school to our friends the Peters’ house. Then he rode with them to San Jose, where we met them about 8 pm. Andy was running in the San Jose Giants race at 7:30 Saturday morning. Erika was going to run too, but couldn’t due to injury. Then on Saturday afternoon we were going to Oakland to watch the A’s vs Washington Nationals baseball game, and on Sunday the Young Faces of ALS National Corntoss challenge in Piedmont – Andy and Stan were a team, as were David and Paul. 

Saturday morning arrived with Stan throwing up at 5 am. Erika, along with her daughter Maddie and Maddie’s cousin Jacqueline, took Andy to the San Jose Giants stadium for the race. I stayed at the hotel to help Stan. I also had to go to CVS to get some medications he forgot to bring. Erika texted photos (thanks girlfriend!)

Andy, ready to race 5 miles.

After the 5 mile race with his medal and Madison Bumgarner bobblehead. He got second in his age group. Not bad after being sick two days before!

Then Andy went to the A’s game with the Peters and Paul’s dad. I stayed at the hotel and relaxed, with the A’s game on TV on mute, listening to Stan talk like a pirate he was so miserable. (Lots of Argh Matey and You Scurvy Dog, as you can imagine.) I was reading a book about Captain Cook so the language fit right in. He threw up until noon and had diarrhea too. The lucky ones at the baseball game saw an exciting one with lots of home runs.

Stan was not getting better so I texted our friend Peggie, who is a cardiac nurse practitioner. She recommended the emergency room for fluids. I could not convince him to get up. When everyone got back from the baseball game, I asked Paul to come help. He was able to help Stan get dressed and out of bed, and the hotel brought a wheelchair. We left the kids at the pool, and drove to the closest emergency room.The kids also had permission to order room service dinner and watch a movie.

We went to Santa Clara Valley Hospital and there was construction at the ER entrance.Paul had to go in and get a wheelchair for Stan.

The Emergency Room in San Jose was an interesting place to be on a Saturday evening. It was really busy. Stan was triaged and then we waited. They took him for an x ray and then he had an EKG. Then more waiting. He became delerious, with his eyes not focusing and trouble keeping them open. Paul talked to the Physician’s Assistant in charge of ER intake, saying that we were more concerned about him now than we were when we came in. This bumped him up in triage. He was brought to a cubby behind the checkin and they took his vitals. I wrote on my boogie board, “He needs fluids STAT” and showed it to the PA and he responded right away. An IV was started and they gave him anti nausea meds. He was finally moved to an ER room. At 1:30 in the morning they decided to admit him. I texted Erika, and the angel she is, she came and got me.

I can’t thank Paul and Erika enough. Without their help it would have been a nightmare. On Sunday morning Stan was still in the ER. We were in the San Jose Hilton and Apple’s Developers Conference was starting the next day at the convention center connected to the hotel, so there was no way we could extend our stay. Erika took Andy to see Stan, while I stayed back at the hotel and packed everything up. I checked out and gave Andy’s bag to Paul who was hanging out with the kids in their hotel room. Andy would ride back to Sacramento with them, so he could drive home for school the next day. Andy and Erika had returned to the hotel, so Andy rode back to the hospital with me. Erika would pick him up there. By now Stan had been moved to a room. I was glad Andy was with me because it was a maze to find his room. 

We had to bow out of the Corntoss Challenge. I want to thank all of our donors, and I am sorry we could not participate.

  • Kathryn Maple Whitten
  • Joyce and Vince Zodiaco
  • Sam and Karen Hancock
  • Haley Mruz and Drew Sheehy
  • Steve and Dianne Lintz
  • Our biggest challengers (the Peters) 
  • The Silvola’s (my second cousin’s family)
  • Our Connecticut cousins
  • Barb Farrell
  • John and Anita Saunders
  • Pete and Jenna Saunders
  • Tim and Joannie Montagne
  • Alice, Chuck and Rita Hilsabeck
  • Marc Corrado

You all helped us raise over $1000 for ALS TDI, the nonprofit company that has a very promising ALS drug in the pipeline – truly awesome friends and family.

When I got in to see Stan, they were talking about releasing him. Erika texted that she was taking the kids to lunch and she would pick up Andy. Then I sat with Stan for the long wait for discharge. And a long wait it was. Andy went to a park after lunch.

We decided that Andy should head back to Sacramento with the Peters, so he could be sure to get home for school the next day. I texted my neighbor Hella, asking if Andy could stay with them (he doesn’t like to stay alone because he sleeps through his alarm). Hella’s reply was “Sure!!” It’s a good thing we made those arrangements because Stan was not released until 7 pm. I was exhausted from not enough sleep and Stan was not feeeling that great so we only drove a half hour and spent the night in Pleasanton. Then we drove home Monday – still a rather difficult drive because Stan still felt ill and I was too sleepy to help. But we made it home safely, arriving just after Andy got home from school.

Andy finished school this week, and after four days of finals, a very busy weekend before, and illness, he pulled off the grades he had set as his goal – all A’s and B’s. We are very proud.

This week we also got a new Polaris side by side so I won’t have to stay home when the boys go out on their dirtbikes.

Busy busy busy and not all as planned but it worked out in the end. Lots of love, connection and hope. And I did remember a dream last night so I am having REM sleep. And best of all, I avoided the stomach virus!

2 thoughts on “Beautiful Camping then the Best Laid Plans….

  1. Meg,
    Makes me happy to read about your adventure camping ,
    And , just to make you smile,
    I beat you by a couple years on the Botox!,
    But not because of my persistent vanity!,
    But to quell the involuntary muscle movements in my oaralyzed left arm to assist therapy
    Gods best to you and your excellent family , please keep writing
    There are many who care,
    Even those with pretty left arms!
    Ha!
    Sean

    Liked by 1 person

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