Break Free

Horoscope for Cancer, March 27, 2017

The desire for perfection is a prison. The need for acceptance is a prison. Break free.

I rarely read horoscopes, and I notice they are all so general they apply to everyone. I looked at this one, which is mine, from my ALS perspective and got a different meaning than I would have without ALS.

In my non-ALS life, I long ago gave away the need for perfection. I stayed in a difficult math class in high school rather than transferring to an easier class to keep my straight A’s.

source: truparenting.net

I also gave up the need for acceptance long ago when I realized that people liked me as I was.

With ALS this is more like give up the search for pre-ALS normal life, which is gone forever (although I get teased with simulations of normal every few weeks) and the need for acceptance is my own acceptance of whatever this disease brings.

And more on the March Madness family rivalries: now my dad’s and brother’s team, Loyola, will play my sister Cathy’s team, Michigan, in the final four. And sadly, my brother-in-law Jamie’s Number One seeded Virginia got knocked out in the first round. That’s why it’s called March Madness!

source Marchmadness.com

Loved ones visit from Hawaii and positive changes ensue

There is so much about Jonika and Ollie’s visit that was wonderful. Jonika was helpful, cooking, cleaning, instigating organization for Andy in his bathroom, his room, and in his schoolwork. She even shared her knowledge from two years of weekly therapy to improve our family dynamics. And she also visited with friends and family.

Even Ollie (18 months) likes to help – he likes to shake my food and even pour it (but I can only let him ‘pour’ empty ones), and he likes to help with laundry, and he sweeps. It was great to watch him learn. I was packing up some things to give away that had to fit in the box a specific way. He would watch me put a piece in, then try himself and hand me the next one so he could learn how it fit correctly. He also loves to bounce on beds, swing, and rock in the rocking chair.

in the rocking chair with Granny M

And it was great that he knows some American Sign Language, especially now that I am learning some too. He and I communicate in facial expressions and hand movements, just like communication is done in ASL. When we visited Hawaii when he was only 3 months old, I was still verbal with only vowel sounds and that was all he could do too.

So far, no problem communicating with this young human although his verbal skills are increasing and all I can do now is a monotone sound.

Toddlers also bring home germs. Ollie threw up Thursday morning and by Saturday Andy, Stan, and Jonika were all sick. I had to go into mom mode and clean up Andy’s bed linens so I was exposed.

Andy convelescing on the couch watching the Olympics while Stan rallies himself to entertain Ollie

And sure enough, 48 hours after exposure I got the bug. But I was ready with my extension tube on my Mic-key button and an extra large plastic cup next to me all night. When I woke up with my button hopping up and down and I got that about to throw up feeling, I opened the tube into the cup. Even laying on bed it exploded in bursts into the cup. When I got up, I started with Gatorade and when that stayed down I did my meds. For new readers, you won’t remember my norovirus when I was still working. I could not stop vomiting and it would get stuck in my esophagus, burning away, until I could cough assist it out. That was only resolved with hospitalization. It was miserable and my esophogeal muscles work even less well now.

It was a snowy day, so Ollie got to go out and experience it for the first time. He was fine, walking around in wonder, until he fell and his hands got too cold. Then he cried and cried, and I think he was saying, “Take me back to Hawaii Mom!”

I had some more Gatorade and went back to bed. I slept a couple hours, then did cough assist and suction and had some more Gatorade. I kept the extension tube connected so I can monitor what comes out while I’m awake. By noon, I was able to tolerate one box of food.

My friend Alice stopped by to bring me some slipper socks, perfect for a snowy day.

In addition to extra family and friend visits during their stay (which were wonderful), Jonika had recommendations for our interactions with Andy. She has the unique insight of a 30-something adult, who is now a mom, and who spent four years being parented by us. One thing that really hit home was that we have to be role models, including cleaning up our cluttered areas if we expect Andy to keep his things uncluttered. So I worked on my office, which had been on my to do list for a long time. It is something that I have to do before we can do taxes. But this time, I am purging big time and I ordered a new rug to help motivate me. Another thing is to help Andy with time management, but only if wants help, and that has already helped more than once.

Jonika and Ollie left to fly back to Hawaii early on Wednesday morning. All three of us will miss them greatly.

January blues, February hopes

What is it about the month of January that is depressing? So many of my friends with ALS wrote about depression last month. There was even a widely shared post about the choice of death or divorce – a man in the United States who decided to get a tracheotomy rather than dying and his wife divorced him after that because of the burden of care.

I have had my own pity party because of the post nasal drip and drooling and mucous that are still plaguing me. My neurologist at UCSF said it is not an ALS problem. She has not seen it before. I went to an ENT in Reno and a CT scan of my sinuses was clear. But now I have an expitided referral to the UCSF ENT department (we will see how they define expedited). The next step after, if needed, will be my Gastroenterologist and the earliest appointment I could get is April 4.

Let me tell you what this has evolved to – I get bad sinus headaches to the point of bad eye pressure and sometimes even ear aches. I have found that using Mucinex every 4 hours followed by cough assist and suction sometime in between can usually keep things moving. I also try to stay upright – standing or sitting to facilitate gravity assisted movement through esophagus. It takes a lot of time to manage and makes it hard to have plans away from home. But if this is my very own ALS journey (and it obviously is) I will have to readjust my expectations and figure out how to be happy with this.

It reminds me of my ALS diagnosis saga – every new antibiotic or doctors appointment brings hope that things will be better. And every failure is depressing like the lack of finding problems was during the “Please anything but ALS” phase.

But I have read beautiful memoirs by people with cancer (When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi and The Bright Hour: A Memoir of Living and Dying by Nina Riggs). Both described their lives with cancer and it sounds in many ways worse than ALS. Although neither book dwelled on the difficult or painful parts, they were mentioned. I guess the only easy way to die is suddenly. One happy outcome from those two books is that Paul’s wife and Nina’s husband are now in love.

So I am challenging myself to find a happy outcome. I can plan on getting help soon at UCSF and at my Gastroenterologist in April. And I can fake it until I make it or until it is over. I am lucky that I am not aspirating this thin drainage. I am lucky it is not affecting my breathing, although I often can’t make through the night with my bipap because of too much mucous in my mouth. And I am lucky to be able to still use my hands and arms and legs.

Because I can still use my hands and arms, Stan and I decided to take a Community Education American Sign Language (ASL) class. It is frustrating for Stan when I do charades not very well so our communication has been difficult. Plus if we use my phone to navigate, my voice is the same as the GPS lady who says, “Take the second left”. We had the first class and it was fun with a great teacher. It was overwhelming at the beginning but with practice it became easier. Finger spelling has already helped us. Once when Stan was leaving and I had some mail to go out, he asked where it needed to dropped and I finger spelled our mailbox. That saved me from having to run to get phone or Boogie Board or paper and pen to write. Fingerspelling has also been helpful riding in the car. We were also told that practicing fingerspelling while driving or riding in a car with license plates and signs would be a great way to start. We have a lot of online homework, but it is fun. I love that it is a whole body language and I have always loved learning languages.

Other things keeping us busy are Jonika and Ollie visiting until 2/14. They are a joy to have with us.

Jonika and I took Ollie to the playground at Idlewild. One of the play structures had the American Sign Language alphabet!

A Hawaii boy riding a whale!
A Hawaii boy with a Nevada light saber!

Jonika’s best friend Lyndi came over with her same aged son Landon.

It was so nice to see Lyndi again after so many years.

We also had a nice visit with Stan’s mother, Sharon, and Jonika’s mother, Terry. We enjoyed a meal at Naan and Kabob and relaxing visits at our house.

And more Ollie cuteness:

Last Friday we left as soon as Andy got home from school, and drove to Sacramento’s Golden 1 Center for the Kings versus Warriors NBA game. We met my best friend Erika and her kids there. It was very loud so Ollie had ear protection.

Photo by Erika Gotsch Peters
Lazy eyed me with my best friend! (photo by Erika)
Andy with his buddies Maddie and David
It was exciting to see so many NBA stars playing a good game
Photo by Erika Gotsch Peters

Jonika and Ollie were ready to leave after the third quarter so Erika and I left with them and went back to Erika’s house in Eldorado Hills. It meant we missed the fourth quarter where Kevin Durant took over and brought the Warriors to victory. But it gave us more time to visit with Erika and Stan stayed and had fun with the older kids.

The next morning we had a nice breakfast and more fun with Ollie.

Photo by Erika Gotsch Peters

Then we drove to El Cerrito to pick up Andy’s viola bow which was being rehaired. We stayed in Oakland on the estuary. Saturday night we drove across the Bay Bridge and across San Francisco to cousin Julie’s. Julie had not seen Andy since he was Ollie’s age and she hadn’t seen Jonika since she was a teenage highland dancer. Julie’s grandmother was Stan’s great grandfather’s little sister and they were from Scotland. We had a wonderful visit.

Julie was very close to Stan’s grandparents Mac and Olive, and she loved, as we all do, that Oliver was named after Olive.

On Sunday morning we met Jonika’s friend Rob for brunch in Oakland. Rob is Jonika’s mother’s best friend’s son so they have been friends since childhood.

Then we drove home, listening to the first quarter of the Super Bowl on the way.

And so began February, with good distractions from my illness, and hopes that things will soon get better with my sinus problem.

the end of our Hawaii trip and back home to child proof

On Sunday night Jonika and Ollie went to a birthday party.

all dressed up for the birthday party

Stan and Andy and I went to the restaurant at the Kona Country Club. We had a great view of Keauhou Bay and the dive boats with their lights for manta ray diving.

On Monday, our last full day in Hawai’i, we were treated to a whale watching tour on the Body Glove Boat, which is where Jonika and Chris met when they both worked in the boat.

Jonika and Andy, cousins, enjoying the boat
Ollie with dad Chris

We got very close to the whales, and one even bumped the boat! I saw a baby one swimming next to mom. They winter in Hawai’i for mating and giving birth, then make a beeline for Alaska for the summer. We had a naturalist telling us all about them.

there were Spinner Dolphins swimming around too.

The naturalist told us all about the whales’ mating rituals, and we realized we had the results of the Body Glove Boat mating ritual with us. And we love them.

That night we went out for our farewell dinner at Lava Java, a nice ocean front venue with the sound of crashing waves.

Then Tuesday we packed up and Chris and Jonika and Ollie came over to help us clean up the condo and get packed up. With a very short connection in L.A., we knew we had to pack for an extra day, including my food. We put all our meds and toothbrushes in my carryon bag.

When we got to the airport we didn’t have much time to spare. They were lining up the pre boarders. But they soon announced a delay. And then more delay. And we were in the open air airport in the voggy wind. They kept announcing, “no updates, please continue to wait”. We finally made our way to the enclosed restaurant. And then we saw that something had been announced. Stan went to find out. I saw the flight crew leaving as Stan came back and said the flight was canceled. American would put us up at the Hilton Waikiloa with meal vouchers and taxi vouchers. We and all the other passengers had to stand in line for our vouchers and to rebook. We were talking to the people around us and we made a new friend, Anssi from Finland. He had been there for an IT convention. The agent found us a flight the next day on Alaska Airlines which would get us home that night. Our original flight was rescheduled for 4 pm the following day which would get us to Los Angeles after the last flight to Reno.

We rode in a great taxi for the 1/2 hour ride up to Waikiloa. The driver was the owner of a fleet and he said he or another driver would pick us up at 10:30 the next morning.

Our room was on the ground floor right in front of the dolphin pool. Andy called Chris and he said “Sweet!” and said he and Ollie would come early to swim.

We had dinner in a sports bar and Anssi walked by so we invited him to sit with us. We learned a lot about him and Helsinki. He is a sailor and a skier like us. He had been to Reno for gambling and skiing at Squaw Valley. He learned a lot about us too! We will keep in touch.

The next morning Chris and Ollie showed up bright and early. We went to brunch on American Airlines dime.

Then Andy and Chris and Ollie went swimming and Stan and I packed up. On the way out of the hotel there was a man with a parrot.

Our taxi was waiting at 10:30 AM.

And then we flew off the island.

if you look closely, in the distant left you can see snow up on Mauna Kea

Then we finally arrived home and had a few days of sleeping late on Hawai’i time. We also had to do major baby proofing because Jonika and Ollie will be here on January 16, coming to stay with us for a month. Jonika was shaken by Stan’s septic shock as we all were, and we were all reminded that life is short.

Jonika’s best friend, Lyndi, has a son the same age. Jonika said Ollie and Landon meeting will be a dream come true.

they made it! a quick lunch after 2 long flights overnight

I was hoping that my sinuses would clear up by getting out of the vog. But they are still draining. I hope to see an Ear, Nose, and Throat doctor soon.

I also started my fourth round of Radicava and my motion sensors for the precision medicine program arrived. I do have to spend a lot of time managing my illness, leaving little time for pleasure things, like knitting or playing piano and I wonder when I will be able to go back to aqua fitness. I decided to pick up my knitting and the meditative aspect of helps me ignore my sinus problems. I posted a long time ago that ALS is a disease of ch-ch-ch-ch-changes. And life is full of the same.

Even Sue, the T Rex from the Field Museum in Chicago, where Stan and I both saw her as kids, is visiting Reno at our Terry G. Wells Discovery Museum.

Island life and ALS

On the Big Island of Hawai’i we enjoyed our grandson immensely.

photo by Jonika

And it was so nice to spend time with Chris and Jonika too.

I had a little snafu on New Year’s Eve – my suction machine broke. And it being Sunday and New Year’s Eve, no medical supply companies could be reached and wouldn’t be reachable until Tuesday. It is lucky I married a MacGyver like guy – he tried to fix the suction machine but he could not – “I could fix this if I was at home.” So in true MacGyver fashion he hooked it up to the vacuum cleaner so I could use it. It gave me an appreciation for the ALS patients in Puerto Rico and other islands after the devastating hurricanes. They were left in a worse state than I was – not a broken motor with a McGuyver guy around but no power for days. It is truly scary to be without suction when you need it badly.After a nice dinner at our condo with Jonika, Chris and Ollie; Andy decided to break the rules and swim after sunset on the last night of 2017.

Then he stayed up to watch the fireworks from the condo deck. But he is the only one.  Stan and I hit the sack before even midnight in Chicago. But I was up at 3 AM coughing and I saw the moonlight on the deck.

the now 2018 moon.

I did not feel I could turn on the vacuum at that hour of the night, because most condos had windows and sliders open. So I took some benadryl and went back to sleep. But I used the vacuum cleaner suction quite a bit on New Year’s Day.

Stan and I took it easy on New Year’s Day. But in the afternoon Andy walked to the pretty, rocky beach down the street.  He called to report that the waves were big.  So he came back and in the waning light of the first day of the new year we drove to Magic Sands Beach. Andy and I ventured into the water.

photo by Stan

I watched him bodysurf a couple waves and then I dove to ride one myself. But I forgot to close my mouth and got a mouthful of salty sea water. I came up coughing – not having a working epiglottis I can’t protect my airway. Plus I haven’t had salt in over a year, so it was very salty in my mouth. A woman asked if I was ok and Andy came over to help me.

photo by Stan

I bent down to write in the wet sand to tell Andy what happened.

photo by Stan

We walked back to where Stan was sitting on a rock.

photo by Stan
photo by Stan

After sitting a few moments, Andy and I went to rinse off in the outdoor shower. When we got back, I sat for a few minutes and realized that I had just done a natural netti pot – my sinuses were draining mightily. So we had to go back to the condo so I cough assist and use the jerry rigged suction. Then I slept for an hour but had to get up at 8 pm to eat dinner. I woke up coughing at 2 am and not being confident of sleeping with such irritated lungs or willing to turn on the vaccuum cleaner with all the windows open in the neighboring condos, I stayed up and finished my book. But at least I went in the ocean and it was exciting before scary.

It wasn’t until Tuesday after the holiday that we could work on a replacement for the suction machine. Our home Durable Medical Equipment (DME) company Bennett arranged for a machine from a Big Island DME.  It was delivered Wednesday. It is not portable.

It is heavy and has no case. And we are supposed to carry it back with us so Bennett can ship it back to Hawaii. So Stan called the company but all he got was a run around and voicemails. I texted our rep from Bennett and she had the local DME call Stan. He got a call back Thursday morning saying the DME didn’t have a portable suction machine. But they said they will look for one.

We went to the Hulihe’e Palace with Jonika, which we had not seen before.

This historic home was built in 1838. It belonged to the governor of the island of Hawai’i. When his son married into Hawaiian royalty it became a favorite retreat of royal families. It houses a collection of ancient Hawaiian artifacts and personal memorabilia of 19th century Hawaiian royalty, including beautiful koa wood furniture and bowls. There was also ancient jewelry and weapons. There was a very entertaining guide upstairs.

The view out of one of the first floor rooms.

After the palace tour we had a nice lunch in a new restaurant that Jonika had wanted to try.

the beautiful flower adorned food

Still dealing with mucous, I tried a medrol dose pack and a stronger antibiotic. I also had to refill my Xanax which I take for ALS anxiety which is a very real thing, especially after watching my mom go through it. I had a refill from my Reno doctor but in Hawai’i for controlled substances, only prescriptions written by Hawai’i doctors can be filled. So we went to urgent care Tuesday night and got the prescription – and will have to send the bill into our insurance company. And then we went to dinner.

a dinner conversation about 2018 expectations and goals

Another night we had a nice dinner at Jonika’s house with friends of theirs from Portland, Oregon. Jonika and Mike have been friends since riding the bus to middle school and high school from our house – he lived around the corner from us. Jonika made a pumpkin soup in a pumpkin that I heard nothing but raves about.

While Stan and Jonika were grocery shopping for the dinner party, Stan got a call from the DME that they had a portable suction machine, so they went and picked it up. It is the best suction machine I have had yet.

We babysat for Ollie quite a bit. He is a sweet helpful child until he is tired and I think he is growing this week – he is sleeping a lot and we see him learning new things.

Jonika’s work on phones for Seaquest, the boat company she works for, is wonderfully flexible. She can be at home or wherever and just has to answer phones and book trips on her iPad. She can get things done between phone calls. She can do this work in Reno too when she visits later this month. She also works in the office and does sales presentations for the company.
Despite his lethargic parents, Andy had fun. 

Chris took him  cliff diving (video by Chris):​

And Jonika took him zip lining.

Andy and I took Ollie to the pool.

It was a week of love, connection, and hope – hope that my sinus mucous would clear up. I could be reacting to the vog which is gases from the volcano. Vog and dogs and cats and pollen – my body reacts to the world I live in and I may be managing mucous the rest of my life. Allergies and sinus infections used to be  minor inconveniences but now I can’t blow my nose or cough or swallow well but I am still hopeful the problem will clear up, and in the meantime I will pick my nose and hack into cough assist and suck out mucous with suction and be thankful for electricity.

Holidays, family and friends: love and connection

We spent Christmas with Stan’s dad and step mom, Cathy.  Stan left for Las Vegas five days before Andy and me. He drove down towing our RZR side by side in order to spend a few days taking his dad off road. His dad has loved hiking and getting out in the wild his whole life, but due to his health he has not been able to go out.

Stan texted me this photo and it was wonderful to see John out in the land he loves.

They had a great time for three days exploring the hills near Vegas.

Andy and I flew down Friday night after Andy finished finals. We had a nice visit. There are four dogs in that house and I was bothered by an allergy to the dog hair. I know I talk a lot about allergies in this blog, but with Bulbar ALS at the extent I have it, it is a big problem. I can’t swallow or cough or blow my nose. The week before Christmas I realized my symptoms were indicative of a sinus infection.  My awesome nurse practitioner called in a Zpac for me, and then a second one. And it was still with me.  So she called in Cipro for me. I started to feel better, but the intense dog allergy made it hard to know if the antibiotics were working.

Stan had a bout of food poisoning while we were in Vegas and was sick for a day. But for once he got sick and didn’t end up in the hospital. 

Andy helped Grandpa by picking all the ripe lemons off the tree in the back yard. They were posing for a photo, both holding handles on the bag when it broke.

On December 23, Stan’s step mom Cathy’s friend, Sandy, came over and we had a nice visit. 

Andy even played his viola for all of us.

Grandpa was a great music holder

Christmas was a nice gathering of my inlaws’ friends. The guests all were impressed with my text to speech app on my phone with my wireless keyboard and my Boogie Board too.  We shared stories and laughed. 

Stan gave me some gifts that will help me deal with my ALS. One is a charging cellphone case. I use my phone to speak so by mid afternoon my battery is already running low. I have tried external batteries but they are cumbersome and the charger connections don’t last long. Now I can charge overnight and both phone and case charge and in the morning the phone is charged and when the charge goes down the phone case takes over charging it. So my charge now lasts all day. It is wonderful. Another thing is a pill grinding syringe.

It has a grinding surface at the bottom of the syringe, so you can grind a pill or pills right in the syringe with the plunger. It works best to suck in some water and suspend the ground medication in an aqueous solution. Then it can go right into my stomach through my Mic-key Tube.

The day after Christmas we drove to Kingston, Nevada to visit our good friends, Ann and John, at Miles End Bed and Breakfast. This was the end of their Christmas brèak. They had just returned from Carson City that afternoon. We were the only guests and they brought pizza from Carson for dinner. That was fine because we were there as friends, not B&B guests. 

Long time friends Ann and Stan talking while Zee enjoys a Christmas present of dog biscuits.

But in the morning, Stan and Andy enjoyed John’s normal wonderful breakfast. Ann had to run off to work at the clinic, which she runs. So we packed up, said goodbye to John, and stopped by the clinic to say goodbye too Ann.

Andy drove us home and we got home mid afternoon.  We had to unpack, do laundry, and pack for another trip – this one to Hawai’i. But we were able to have dinner with my sister Cathy and Rick and 10-year-old Sam, visiting from Portland, Oregon. It was too bad that was all the time we had to visit. It was also too bad I was so tired I didn’t even take photos. But here is one they texted from San Francisco a few days later.

Then we flew to Hawai’i. I was worried about needing cough assist and suction on the long flight. But I went and talked to the flight attendants in the back and asked where I could do it. They asked if I could use the bathroom. I said no, too small. Then they offered me the back row of the plane (their seats) while they did beverage service. That worked out great because it was so loud back there that no one noticed me coughing with the cough assist or suctioning and both are loud.

Our niece who we raised lives on the Big Island and her son Oliver is 18 months old. We are his ‘grandparents’ and so proud of this handsome, smart boy (spoken like every grandmother😎).

Andy and Jonika have a bond closer than cousins. And Andy has a special bond with Ollie too.

We had a crazy surreal and funny dinner at a restaurant that will not be named. The waitress had real difficulty with our order, bringing the wrong things and totally forgetting one meal. But it was very fun and I was told the food that did come was great. 

Chris and Stan
Headstrong Ollie saying no to mom

Chris ended up getting his food to go. That led to jokes that may continue the whole trip – like ‘we could go back to that restaurant – but we might want to eat before we go!’

My morning view on December 31, 2017. The ocean is in the distance on the right.
New Year’s Eve 2017 (photo by Chris Grossi)

I had lots of love, connection, and hope in 2017 and I am looking forward to lots of the same in 2018 too. I hope you find the same.

Folsom Prison Blues

Johnny Cash played at Folsom Prison four times in the late 1960’s and early 1970’s


Folsom Prison by Johnny Cash

I hear the train a comin ’round the bend
I ain’t seen the sunshine since I don’t know when
Well I’m stuck in Folsom Prison and time keeps dragging on
While a train keeps a rollin’ on down to San Antone

Well when I was just a baby my mama told me son
Always be a good boy don’t ever play with guns
Well I shot a man in Reno just to watch him die
When I hear that whistle blowin’ I hang my head and I cry

Well I’ll bet there’s rich folks eatin’ in some fancy dining car
Probably drinkin’ coffee and smokin’ big cigars
Well I know I had it comin’ I know I can’t be free
But those people keep a movin’ that’s what tortures me

Well if they freed me from this prison if that railroad train was mine
Bet I’d move it on a little farther down the line
Far from Folsom Prison that’s where I long to stay
Then I’d let that lonesome whistle blow my blues away

Source  https://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/johnnycash/folsomprisonblues.html

On Saturday we met our friend Paul for lunch in Folsom, California. After a Mexican lunch, we decided to tour the Folsom Prison Museum. When I googled the lyrics for Johnny Cash’s famous Folsom Prison Blues, the analogy to ALS struck me. “But those people keep moving and that’s what tortures me.” For ALS patients their own bodies become prisons while their minds keep working. Sort of like prisoners. The museum had a large section of crafts made by the prisoners – they had time and their minds still worked. This large Ferris Wheel made of toothpicks took a long time to build. 

Well if they freed me from this prison if that railroad train was mine
Bet I’d move it on a little farther down the line
Far from Folsom Prison that’s where I long to stay
Then I’d let that lonesome whistle blow my blues away

For ALS patients, to be freed from our ALS prisons we would gladly hop on that train and let that lonesome whistle blow our blues away.

The old railroad gate with a historic guard house behind
Some prisoners managed to escape from Folsom Prison. For ALS prisoners, those that escape either die or they were misdiagnosed. But we are all hoping and working toward a cure

Those of you who know Paul and Stan and know how their minds work together will see the humourous mild irony in this picture of them in front of Folsom Prison.

Like the prisoners enjoying Johnny Cash’s concerts, ALS patients can continue to enjoy music too, because hearing is not affected. On Tuesday we enjoyed Andy’s Reno Philharmonic Youth Orchestra concert with my dad and Anita and Stan’s cousin Lisa. It was amazing to hear the quality of sound coming from the students in the three orchestras. The students range in age from 7th to 12th grade. Andy’s orchestra even had ballet dancers for Aaron Copeland’s Rodeo which was written as a ballet.

Andy is second chair viola, right in front of the conductor

On Friday I had my salivary gland Botox injections and my ALS clinic appointment at UCSF. My takeaways:

  • Botox – we had a long talk with the doctor about my mucous problem and drooling when the Botox wears off and he adjusted the dose and made my next appointment in ten weeks instead of twelve 
  • Nutrition – I am maintaining steady weight which is good. It was recommended that I add Senna once a day to try to regulate my bowels.
  • Neurologist – she verified my slow progression and referred me to an Ear, Throat, and Nose Specialist for my allergies.
  • Speech – I told her that I never want to be unable to communicate. She gave me a low tech letter board like the one my mom had but this one has a laser pointer that can clip to glasses or a visor and it has commonly used words on it. My mom’s only had letters and we had to point to each letter until she nodded. I now realize how much mom had to say but she could not. I remember when she wanted to tell me something and she spelled out I love you. I have enough trouble saying all I want with my electronic text to speech.
  • Social Worker – we discussed upcoming travel and she facilitated a letter for the airlines and TSA so I can carry my medical equipment on the plane with me. I had all of my equipment with me so the letter contains all the serial numbers.
  • Respiratory – we did not attempt the forced vital capacity or other normal measurements because of my vocal chord involvement in my breathing. But she did measure my normal breathing CO2 output because I have been a little more breathless doing housework, and ordered overnight pulse oximeter study, and increased my Bipap pressures because I somtimes wake up with headaches.
  • Research Project – we had participated in a blood draw research study at the last clinic visit where I was the patient and Stan was the control. This time we each had to fill out a questionnaire. 
  • Blood work – it was nice to be able to go downstairs and get it done 

We are blessed to have a wonderful relative to stay with – Stan’s dad’s cousin Julie. We love her and she lives close to UCSF.

Thanks for another great visit Julie!

I am on the slow train to the ALS prison. I don’t know why my progression is slow. But I am a patient fellow for the ALS/MND International Symposium in Boston starting Friday and I will represent all ALS patients. Please send me your questions and comments for researchers and I will try to get answers. You can comment on this blog or on Facebook or on Twitter.

I will not write a blog next Monday. But I plan two Boston blogs: one from the patient fellow perspective and one from the visiting family perspective. I will be visiting my aunt and uncle the first night and my godmother the last two nights including a lunch with my mom’s cousin, with the conference in between.