Folsom Prison Blues

Johnny Cash played at Folsom Prison four times in the late 1960’s and early 1970’s


Folsom Prison by Johnny Cash

I hear the train a comin ’round the bend
I ain’t seen the sunshine since I don’t know when
Well I’m stuck in Folsom Prison and time keeps dragging on
While a train keeps a rollin’ on down to San Antone

Well when I was just a baby my mama told me son
Always be a good boy don’t ever play with guns
Well I shot a man in Reno just to watch him die
When I hear that whistle blowin’ I hang my head and I cry

Well I’ll bet there’s rich folks eatin’ in some fancy dining car
Probably drinkin’ coffee and smokin’ big cigars
Well I know I had it comin’ I know I can’t be free
But those people keep a movin’ that’s what tortures me

Well if they freed me from this prison if that railroad train was mine
Bet I’d move it on a little farther down the line
Far from Folsom Prison that’s where I long to stay
Then I’d let that lonesome whistle blow my blues away

Source  https://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/johnnycash/folsomprisonblues.html

On Saturday we met our friend Paul for lunch in Folsom, California. After a Mexican lunch, we decided to tour the Folsom Prison Museum. When I googled the lyrics for Johnny Cash’s famous Folsom Prison Blues, the analogy to ALS struck me. “But those people keep moving and that’s what tortures me.” For ALS patients their own bodies become prisons while their minds keep working. Sort of like prisoners. The museum had a large section of crafts made by the prisoners – they had time and their minds still worked. This large Ferris Wheel made of toothpicks took a long time to build. 

Well if they freed me from this prison if that railroad train was mine
Bet I’d move it on a little farther down the line
Far from Folsom Prison that’s where I long to stay
Then I’d let that lonesome whistle blow my blues away

For ALS patients, to be freed from our ALS prisons we would gladly hop on that train and let that lonesome whistle blow our blues away.

The old railroad gate with a historic guard house behind
Some prisoners managed to escape from Folsom Prison. For ALS prisoners, those that escape either die or they were misdiagnosed. But we are all hoping and working toward a cure

Those of you who know Paul and Stan and know how their minds work together will see the humourous mild irony in this picture of them in front of Folsom Prison.

Like the prisoners enjoying Johnny Cash’s concerts, ALS patients can continue to enjoy music too, because hearing is not affected. On Tuesday we enjoyed Andy’s Reno Philharmonic Youth Orchestra concert with my dad and Anita and Stan’s cousin Lisa. It was amazing to hear the quality of sound coming from the students in the three orchestras. The students range in age from 7th to 12th grade. Andy’s orchestra even had ballet dancers for Aaron Copeland’s Rodeo which was written as a ballet.

Andy is second chair viola, right in front of the conductor

On Friday I had my salivary gland Botox injections and my ALS clinic appointment at UCSF. My takeaways:

  • Botox – we had a long talk with the doctor about my mucous problem and drooling when the Botox wears off and he adjusted the dose and made my next appointment in ten weeks instead of twelve 
  • Nutrition – I am maintaining steady weight which is good. It was recommended that I add Senna once a day to try to regulate my bowels.
  • Neurologist – she verified my slow progression and referred me to an Ear, Throat, and Nose Specialist for my allergies.
  • Speech – I told her that I never want to be unable to communicate. She gave me a low tech letter board like the one my mom had but this one has a laser pointer that can clip to glasses or a visor and it has commonly used words on it. My mom’s only had letters and we had to point to each letter until she nodded. I now realize how much mom had to say but she could not. I remember when she wanted to tell me something and she spelled out I love you. I have enough trouble saying all I want with my electronic text to speech.
  • Social Worker – we discussed upcoming travel and she facilitated a letter for the airlines and TSA so I can carry my medical equipment on the plane with me. I had all of my equipment with me so the letter contains all the serial numbers.
  • Respiratory – we did not attempt the forced vital capacity or other normal measurements because of my vocal chord involvement in my breathing. But she did measure my normal breathing CO2 output because I have been a little more breathless doing housework, and ordered overnight pulse oximeter study, and increased my Bipap pressures because I somtimes wake up with headaches.
  • Research Project – we had participated in a blood draw research study at the last clinic visit where I was the patient and Stan was the control. This time we each had to fill out a questionnaire. 
  • Blood work – it was nice to be able to go downstairs and get it done 

We are blessed to have a wonderful relative to stay with – Stan’s dad’s cousin Julie. We love her and she lives close to UCSF.

Thanks for another great visit Julie!

I am on the slow train to the ALS prison. I don’t know why my progression is slow. But I am a patient fellow for the ALS/MND International Symposium in Boston starting Friday and I will represent all ALS patients. Please send me your questions and comments for researchers and I will try to get answers. You can comment on this blog or on Facebook or on Twitter.

I will not write a blog next Monday. But I plan two Boston blogs: one from the patient fellow perspective and one from the visiting family perspective. I will be visiting my aunt and uncle the first night and my godmother the last two nights including a lunch with my mom’s cousin, with the conference in between.

Thanksgiving in the U.S. – what I am thankful for

Last Thursday, November 23, was Thanksgiving in the U.S. It is a traditional four day weekend but our local school district added the day before a few years ago, so now it’s a five day weekend. 

We drove to my sister Beth’s in California on Wednesday. She lives south of San Jose, in San Martin. My dad and stepmother, Anita, also drove from Reno. Beth and her husband Jamie have a beautiful home overlooking the CordeValle golf course and a vineyard. Jamie’s sons Phillip and Jack were there too. Because of not quite enough beds, Stan and I stayed at the golf club.

The view from our room.

We had a lovely Thanksgiving dinner at the club.

The beautiful menu – the food was equally beautiful. Jamie’s last name should have a capital B. That is the opposite problem from ours – the small d Macdonalds.

My dad, Phillip, Jamie, Jack, Beth, me, Stan, Andy, and Anita

Although I could not eat the turkey or any of the other wonderful food, I got into the turkey day spirit by drawing a turkey on my feeding tube. Thank you Laura Furumoto for the idea!

We went around the table and each said one thing we are thankful for. Among the comments: indoor plumbing, antibiotics, the first amendment, and the family we were sharing dinner with. Although it is hard to prioritize what I am thankful for, I said I am thankful to still be able self care after nearly two years with ALS. That is not just selfish because it impacts my son and husband greatly. I also seconded the comments about being thankful for everyone at that table. In addition, I am thankful for all of our relatives who we were not with on Thanksgiving.

I am thankful for my friends. Erika and her daughter Maddie came up from Eldorado Hills and spent Friday night and part of Saturday with us. Andy had to sell Christmas trees at his Boy Scout lot at Shoppers Square. Erika bought a tree and I bought a wreath. We will be with Stan’s dad and stepmother for Christmas so we don’t need a tree.

Marvelous Maddie with our wreath
Erika and Maddie with the tree on top of their car to drive over Donner Summit, with Andy and Cooper, who sold her the tree.

Erika even hung the wreath for me.

There are so many friends I am thankful for: the ones from my elementary school, the ones from high school, the ones from college and grad school, and all the friends I have met since I moved to Reno, and also the ones I met online that have become flesh and blood friends.

I am thankful for Radicava and the hope it brings for slower progression of my disease. I am thankful for all the researchers around the world who are working for an end to ALS. I am thankful for all the people who work in ALS clinics to help ALS patients have better quality of life. I am thankful for all the wonderful people with ALS and the wonderful caregivers I have met through ALS fundraisers, Facebook, and our local support group. I am thankful for the people who facilitate our support group.

I am thankful to be a patient fellow for the ALS/MND International Symposium in Boston December 8th through December 10th. I again encourage anyone with questions or comments about anything related to ALS/MND that you want the researchers to hear, please send me your questions and comments. I will be your voice at the conference. Again, you can comment on this blog or on Facebook or on Twitter.

I am also thankful for a fun Twitter interaction. The father of neurology is Jean-Martin Charcot, a brilliant doctor in the late 1800’s in France who first identified and classified ALS, MS and other neurological diseases. Well, Jean-Martin Charcot is on Twitter and he shared my blog! I could not agree more!

 Distraction vs Reality

A couple of my friends who blog about ALS and live in the northern hemisphere (Liz in Canada and Christian in Germany) have written about death from ALS in the last week. The days are getting shorter and the leaves are blowing off the trees. Halloween on October 31st with lots of skeleton decorations and Dia de Los Muertos in Mexico on November 1 (All Souls Day in the Catholic church) are holidays with roots in death even though now they are celebrations. So it makes sense that people think about death this time of year.

I am writing about distraction because it’s a coping method for dealing with a fatal disease. I like to be busy and get frustrated when my allergies cause me to have to be tied to my cough assist and suction machines. I must be allergic to sage brush now and that is a plant that spreads pollen in the wind and it will be flying around until we get a good rainy day. (Which might happen Wednesday if the current forecast is correct). Sagebrush is the state flower of Nevada and the hills around Reno are covered with it. I still have major post nasal drip that gets stuck in the back of my mouth. If I breathe through my mouth I breathe through mucous and can’t get a breath. That is why I am still using the napkin in my mouth. It forces me to breathe through my nose. I have a good nasal spray, Dymista, so I am usually able to keep my nose clear. I have a daily to do list and I try to do at least two things on it each day. So my daily to do list and managing allergies are a big part of distracting me from the realities of how this will end. ALS deaths are usually peaceful. My diaphragm will become less and less effective and then I will have difficulty expelling CO2 and I will sleep more and more. I won’t be gasping for breath. Not a bad way to die. My loved ones can be with me. I feel bad that it will be hard for them but I didn’t write this book and can’t change the ending.

I was disappointed to not be able to go to aqua fitness on Saturday November 11, the first day I could swim after my port surgery on October 10. My allergies were too bad. I have tried nearly every antihistamine on the market. Nothing keeps my throat clear long enough. The trick is to find something without major side effects: One that won’t dry my eyes too severely and one that won’t make me too drowsy. I am now trying Zyrtec and a new formulation of it called XYZAL.  It could take up to a week to be effective but my first 10 ml. dose was effective for about 4 hours.

It is ok to be sad about leaving this wonderful world, and we have to grieve at times. But I think it’s ok to carry on with life and do the things that make you happy while you can. I play piano and I knit and I do aqua fitness and spend time with family and friends and I want to do those things until I can’t anymore. 

But I was having my own pity party when I couldn’t swim on the first possible day back. And then I was inspired by a 30-year-old friend with ALS. Early  Sunday morning I read a blog post from Suuny Braus Erasmus who wrote about Franklin D. Roosevelt, who didn’t let paralysis from polio stop him from becoming the 32nd  President of the United States – which had been his goal before polio. Reading that gave me the kick in the ass I needed and I went to aqua fitness on Sunday morning at 8:45. For the first time I kept my napkin in my mouth the whole class and had to focus on nose breathing. It was not comfortable but I got the workout in and that feels good.

I am so inspired by so many younger people with ALS:

  • Sunny Brous Erasmus, diagnosed at age 28, met her husband at 29 and got married at 30 and blogs at sunnystrong.wordpress.com. She continually inspires me. 
  • Sarah Coglianese, diagnosed with ALS at age 33, who just won the Tradition of Excellence Alumni Award at Oak Park River Forest High School. She gave an impressive acceptance speech about empathy and how it could help many of the problems in this world. She has raised very large amounts of money for ALS research with her #whatwouldyougive campaign (which inspires empathy) and is a gifted writer who inspires ALS patients and others with her blog about ALS speed4sarah.com. Despite me being 18 years her senior, she is my mentor and friend. I went to OPRFHS with her aunt.
  • Corey Reich, who was diagnosed in college at age 21 and has raised lots and lots of money for research in his ten years with ALS and he is still a tennis coach at his high school.
  • Andrea Lytle Peet, who was diagnosed at age 34. She was a triathlete and she continues to compete in marathon races on her recumbent bike to raise money for ALS research and blogs at teamdrea.com
  • Osiel Mendoza, who was diagnosed in college at age 21 last year. He married his girlfriend a couple months ago – they have been a couple since 8th grade. He has already raised a lot of money for ALS research. He gave an inspiring speech at ALS TDI’s fundraiser in Boston a few weeks ago.
  • Eryn Criswell Blythe who was diagnosed at age 36 and has two young children. Her husband is her caregiver. She was pushed in her wheelchair in the L.A. Marathon last summer to raise money for research.
  • And Liz https://lizfeltham.wordpress.com and Cristian https://workandloveblog.wordpress.com are both younger than me I believe, and they both inspire me regularly.

These young people are taking what life has dealt them and are making the world a better place and moving forward with optimism. That is certainly enough to stop my 57 year old pity party!

The only picture this week is from Andy’s Cross Country banquet on Wednesday last week. He got a Varsity letter and he got a coaches award for his hard work and improvement. 

I am proud of him for working hard on running. Now he has to figure out how to keep his grades up while participating in a sport that takes so much time (practice 6 days a week). He wants to do track next semester but he will only be able to if he can bring his grades up this semester (family rule). He did it last spring to be able to compete in cross country so I think he can do it again if he can focus on school. Keeping him on track for track is a distraction too. Maybe all these young amazing people with ALS can inspire him too.
I don’t know when my ALS journey will end and I should be more hopeful since I am on the new drug Radicava, but the shorter days and allergy woes were bringing me down. At least we now know that I am probably not allergic to the Radicava since my symptoms have continued on the off cycle. And all I have to do is think of these young people with ALS and my personal pity parties will be over.

 

Halloween and the end of first round of Radicava 

As promised, I reprised my Beauty that Killed the Beast costume for Halloween, and this time got pictures.

Photos by Andy Macdonald

I had to make a little hole in the dress for my feeding tube so I can eat while wearing it. But since King Kong made such a mess of my dress anyway, the little hole was not noticable.

Our street gets filled with cars bringing kids from other neighborhoods. When the doorbell rings every few minutes there are about ten people each time on the porch. After running out of candy very early one year, we decided to never be home again. Luckily, our good friends Chuck and Alice have an annual Halloween party. Stan reprised his Parrot Head costume but Andy changed his up.

Andy got to trick or treat with the younger kids and he filled up a pillow case.

It was a great party with a little boy who dumped his candy on the floor and his dad went through it with him (classic!)

And Dad wanted to steal the candy (also classic!)

Calvin the little pirate was happy with his treasure.

Calvin’s sister Alana with her great grandparents
Doesn’t Alana look comfy with her great grandpa?

Alice had invited two other friends from aqua fitness, Marilyn and Mary. I was able to give them my update and tell them I will be back November 11.

Marilyn from aqua with Rita, Chuck and Alice’s daughter 

I miss my aqua fitness classes so much. They really do cover the range of motion. I had to take a month off after my port surgery which was on October 10. So on Saturday November 11, I will go back. I do my range of motion exercises home but it is not the same as an hour class in the water. And the first time I did the exercises at home was Nov. 2. I also have my ALS TDI Precision Medicine Program motion sensors that I wear for a week each month and have prescribed movements to do every other day and I started wearing them on Nov. 2. I am feeling it in my muscles but I know it is normal to feel sore when starting an exercise program. It is also scary because cramps and muscle soreness can be a sign of ALS progression. But I have to be ready for aqua fitness on October 11. Taking all this time off of exercise was not good for me. But I had plenty to keep me busy with the extra time.

The Patient Fellows and Committee for the ALS/MND International Symposium in Boston had a conference call where we each shared our interests in sessions we hope to attend. There is nice diversity among us so we won’t all be reporting on the same things. It will be tricky balancing attending all the sessions I am interested in with my energy level. 

Our dryer broke and I was able to call to arrange a service visit. I was home alone when the service guy came and I was able to deal with that using my Boogie Board. That hardly seems like a blog worthy event, but anytime I can handle things like this on my own seems like a victory now. 

We also went to a fun fundraiser for Reno High School. It included raffle, silent auction, buy a balloon for a guaranteed prize, and a live auction as well as sit down dinner. We had a fun table with friends from my work, other good friends, and new friends.

With Rene and Janet who I worked with. Photo by Stan Macdonald
Todd and Judy, my mala bracelet friend. Photo by Stan Macdonald
Justin and Suzi Champagne, new friends. Photo by Judy Harrison 
Photo by Judy Harrison

Also at our table were my friend Melissa, who was the photographer for the event, and her husband Charlie, who we met for the first time. The photographer is never in the photos. Sorry Melissa. I wish I had gotten one of you and Charlie.

As part of the live auction they auctioned off about 10 cakes from the Atlantis bakery. If your table bought a cake, that was your dessert. If not, you got cookies. Stan loves chocolate cake so he won the bid for our table.

Paying the winning bid for the cake. Photo by Judy Harrison 
Photo by Judy Harrison 

It was a fun evening supporting our son’s school. We also scored a silent auction item.

The Fly Away “basket” put together by Reno High staff, includes $200 in Southwest Airlines gift cards and all kinds of travel goodies in a nice travel bag. Photo by Sabine Beach

On November 2, Judy and I were going to go see the movie I’ll Push You about two friends who did the Camino de Santiago, and one was in a wheelchair so his best friend pushed him all the way. This was a fundraiser for MDA shown one night only all over the country. When we tried to get tickets it was sold out. But Judy decided to go anyway to see if she could get in. With my allergy symptoms, I did not want to go without a sure ticket. Stan’s cousin Lisa called and said she was in town so we met her at Great Basin for dinner. At 7 pm, Judy texted and said she got two free tickets and could I buzz down to the theater? But because we were out to dinner I could not hop in the car and go. I do hope to see it someday. Judy said the words love, connection, and hope were used many times in the movie 💜. She also said that the guy in the wheelchair was uncomfortable being cared for by others until he realized that helping was making his caregivers happy. That is a good thing for ALS patients to realize. My friend Sunny Brous (another blogger with ALS) shared this quote:

One of the secrets of life is that all that is really worth the doing is what we do for others. – Lewis Carroll

Last week I also completed Round 1 of my Radicava infusions.

Infusion #14 of Round 1

Now I get 14 days off. In the rest of the cycles I only have to do 10 of 14 days. So I will be able to do 5 on, 2 off, and 5 on then have 16 days off.

The weather forecast is showing the next three nights should have temperatures below freezing. I hope that this will be the end of my allergy season.

And finally, my online friend whose tagline was “I have ALS, ALS doesn’t have me,” passed away after over 10 years with ALS. Rest in peace Andre Williams, Sr. Your positivity and kindness will be missed.

Fun at Corey’s Crusade and Radicava Round 1, Days 1 through 10

On October 21 we went to Clairmont Country Club in Piedmont, California for the annual Corey’s Crusade fundraiser for ALS TDI. Corey was diagnosed in college. This was his 10th annual party (He is now 31). Every year the party has had a different theme. For this party we could choose a theme for a costume from any of the previous 9 themes.

Margaritaville, Safari, the Beatles, Masquerade, Midnight in Paris, Western, Super Hero, Havana Nights, and Purple Rain.

Stan was a Parrot Head for the Margaritaville theme and Andy chose Purple Rain. I was a superhero of sorts, the Beauty who Killed the Beast.

Andy added round purple sunglasses and purple beads that they had at the party. You will have to wait for Halloween for a good photo of my costume. 
A selfie we took on the way in
With Jen from ALS TDI. We love you Jen! You can see the giant gorilla hand around me. But I promise a better photo on Halloween.

It was a great party where we saw friends and met many nice people. And I am sure they raised a lot of money. We stayed in Walnut Creek because we had to be back in Reno for the 1 pm show Beautiful – Carole King the Musical. I did my Radicava infusion and ate my feeding tube breakfast while Stan and Andy went down to the hotel breakfast. Then we packed up quick and hit the road. We made it by 12:55 pm. This was an 85th birthday present for my dad. It was nice to share such a wonderful show with my dad and Anita and Stan and Andy. Even Andy liked the show.

I have now completed over a week of Radicava. The first few nights I felt that I was sleeping better. I have been remembering dreams again. But by the 4th and 5th day I was having runny nose and lots of thin post nasal drip. There was so much I thought it must be an allergic reaction. We notified Searchlight of a possible reaction. But the next day Stan talked to two different pharmacists from Option Care. They said that it is possible to have an initial reaction to port medicine and it would go away with time. They also said see how I feel on the off weeks. So I loaded up on Benadryl and Sudafed, and I am still hoping for a freeze. I am watching those low overnight forecasts. Come on cold weather!

I can’t swim until a month after my port surgery, which will  be November 11. I can’t wait to get back in the pool. I feel better when I am doing all those range of motion exercises. I will have to start doing them at home for the next two weeks. For the next round of Radicava we have a little more flexibility. It will be ten of 14 days so we can do 5 days on then take the needle out and I can have two days to swim and shower without plastic wrap, and then do the second 5 days. We looked at the November calendar and maximized the days I could swim. I also will explore ways to cover the needle so I can do aqua fitness and stay in shallow water.

My friend Erika came up from Eldorado Hills, California for a quick visit. She learned how to do my infusion. I am able to do the infusion myself now but someday I may need help.

I am so blessed to have wonderful friends and Erika is the best of the best!

Every picture tells a story, don’t it?

If you are on Facebook with me then you already saw this. I was challenged to post 7 Black and White photos of my life on 7 consecutive days with no people and no explanation. Here they are:

This week I had my port installed on Tuesday, to be ready for Radicava infusions as soon as my infusion supplier sets it up which hopefully will be this week. My surgery was scheduled for 4:40 pm. They told me I could eat until 6 am, so I got up early and did that. Around 8:45 I got a call asking if I could be there at 9:30 for 11:30 surgery. So I quickly showered and got there at 9:30.

I waited in a children’s room with this kid hanging out with me all day

When the nurses heard I ate at 6, they had to go talk to the anesthesiologist. They decided to do another surgery before mine and said they would try to do mine around 1 pm. So we waited. 1 pm came and went. Stan went to get lunch. They told me my surgery was back on the schedule for 4:40 pm. I asked if I could have more allergy medicine and the answer was no. I actually cried at this point – I was afraid of aspirating on post nasal drip going into sugery. If I had known I would be there all day I would have brought my meds. But they finally said I could take my own Allegra. Stan was having lunch over by the CVS pharmacy and the nurse called him and asked him to pick up some Allegra. He came back and I took it with just a little water. And still we waited. When 4:40 came and went I felt like punching out a few more teeth on that kid hanging with me, although Stan pointed out that it wasn’t his fault, so I controlled that impulse. Ultimately my surgery started after 5 pm. The surgeon apologized for the mix up and all went well.

Post surgery with lots of permanent marker marks and with a port under the bump on my right side.

Then on Wednesday, we found out that my infusions are being held up by the need for a signature of the contracts manager for the infusion company, who was gone all week. I complained that it is 2017 and anyone can sign anything anywhere anytime. But again, we waited through a weekend to make more progress. Radicava Ridiculousness!

We have received great support from MT Pharma America, the drug company. The long drawn out waiting period has been hard, but hope in an infusion bag is closer than ever.

What sort of beast is man?

You belong among the wildflowers

You belong in a boat out at sea

Tom Petty – Wildflowers

Perhaps a better song to quote is U2’s Sunday, Bloody Sunday. The tragedy in Las Vegas was so unthinkable and horrific. We watched the first episode of Ken Burns’ The Viet Nam War this week. A veteran was quoted saying that there is a reason we are the dominant species on this planet and that people say the military turns boys into men, but no, he said, it is just a finishing school. That was a chilling comment to hear after Sunday. In another movie we watched recently there were mountain lions (scary) but the humans in the movie were much scarier. Our whole state was impacted by the tragedy Sunday. It is sad that our country can’t do more for mentally ill people and can’t come to consensus on gun safety. #BanBumpStocks 

Northern Nevada supports you Las Vegas. The love that poured out among those fleeing as well as the first responders and hospital staffers, as well as the response from the community at blood donation sites in both Las Vegas and Reno, shows the side of humanity I would rather focus on. #VegasStrong #NevadaStrong. I wish that everyone impacted somehow finds peace and recovery soon. I know it will be a long time coming. It affects every security guard in casinos in Las Vegas and in Reno, and many, many other walks of life too and every big city outdoor music festival, as well as the friends and family of the victims. And every victim belongs among the wildflowers or on a boat out to sea, instead of being killed by a human beast.

We also lost a rock and roll icon, Tom Petty, a week ago. I like his music and Stan and I saw him live in Reno many years ago. I chose those two lines from his Wildflowers song not only for the victims but also because I love to be outside among the wildflowers, but my seasonal allergies are really bad this year. I can’t cough or blow my nose or swallow well so I am beholden to my cough assist and suction machine. If I could go on a boat out to sea I could get away from the pollen.

I have had a lot of thick saliva. From the British MND Association website I got a PDF about dealing with saliva in ALS/MND.

I have been taking Pineapple and Papaya Enzymes to help with breaking up the thick saliva. The publication said pineapple juice could be swabbed in the mouth to help with the same thing. We had some pineapple juice, so I swabbed some in my mouth. I got a very quick reduction in thick saliva. But it only lasted about 5 minutes. So then I swabbed some more. And then some more. And soon I had swollen lips and felt as if I OD’d on antihistamines. This could be an allergic reaction. It turns out pineapple is a strong antihistamine. Even if it is not a pineapple allergy, I do not want to OD on antihistamine. I had been trying various combinations of anantihistamines and decongestants and expectorants, to find allergy relief and trying to keep track in my head. But there are way too many variables to keep track of. Plus I really want to find out which med is making my eyes uncomfortable. I messaged my doctor at UCSF to get her input. She agreed that I can methodically try discontinuing one med at a time, and stay off any discontinued for at least a week. I decided to start with Neudexta. I can stay off it and see if I am having psuedobulbar affect (inappropriate laughing and crying). If I am not having that symptom, then I can discontinue it completely. Four days off so far and nothing inappropriate. I am also documenting when I need my eye drops. Yes, I still need them, and yes I am still having allergy symptoms (sneezing – works better than cough assist! I appreciate that I can still sneeze), itchy eyes, runny nose. This could all still turn out to be my seasonal allergies. I am still hoping for a deep freeze soon!

I became empowered this week and decided to make my own phone calls. Stan does not have patience to wait for customer service to pick up and he gets frustrated with being passed on to another hold and phone tag is also frustrating to him. So I sat down with my Speech Assistant on my phone with my wireless keyboard and used our house phone to call our insurance company. I had pre-typed “My name is Margaret Macdonald. Please be patient while I type.” I waited on hold a long time and then I got the screener. I explained that I was calling because the accumulator that my providers see says I have not met my maximums but I have. So my doctors make me pay and then we ultimately get refund checks. Then I was connected with someone who could help. She said she could see the problem and she would send it their IT department. Then she said, “is there anything else I can help you with?” And I said, “yes. I am waiting for approval for a new drug and with my disease every day counts.” She said it is all approved and she would call Option Care, the infusion supplier, for me. Success!

Next I called Searchlight, the patient support group for Radicava – the new drug. Again after a long hold and with a pre-typed opening statement I talked with a customer service representative asking for my Patient ID Number and Case Number, and my status. I was transferred to my case manager. She had my benefit summary and she had already enrolled me in the copay support program. I should receive the benefit summary in the mail on Tuesday. Again success! So now I can make my own phone calls, and my husband will be less frustrated.

My allergy struggles and all my ALS struggles are so very minor compared to the hell created by the human beast in Las Vegas. Now if only we could turn the clock back to before that Sunday, bloody Sunday, night…..