Folsom Prison Blues

Johnny Cash played at Folsom Prison four times in the late 1960’s and early 1970’s


Folsom Prison by Johnny Cash

I hear the train a comin ’round the bend
I ain’t seen the sunshine since I don’t know when
Well I’m stuck in Folsom Prison and time keeps dragging on
While a train keeps a rollin’ on down to San Antone

Well when I was just a baby my mama told me son
Always be a good boy don’t ever play with guns
Well I shot a man in Reno just to watch him die
When I hear that whistle blowin’ I hang my head and I cry

Well I’ll bet there’s rich folks eatin’ in some fancy dining car
Probably drinkin’ coffee and smokin’ big cigars
Well I know I had it comin’ I know I can’t be free
But those people keep a movin’ that’s what tortures me

Well if they freed me from this prison if that railroad train was mine
Bet I’d move it on a little farther down the line
Far from Folsom Prison that’s where I long to stay
Then I’d let that lonesome whistle blow my blues away

Source  https://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/johnnycash/folsomprisonblues.html

On Saturday we met our friend Paul for lunch in Folsom, California. After a Mexican lunch, we decided to tour the Folsom Prison Museum. When I googled the lyrics for Johnny Cash’s famous Folsom Prison Blues, the analogy to ALS struck me. “But those people keep moving and that’s what tortures me.” For ALS patients their own bodies become prisons while their minds keep working. Sort of like prisoners. The museum had a large section of crafts made by the prisoners – they had time and their minds still worked. This large Ferris Wheel made of toothpicks took a long time to build. 

Well if they freed me from this prison if that railroad train was mine
Bet I’d move it on a little farther down the line
Far from Folsom Prison that’s where I long to stay
Then I’d let that lonesome whistle blow my blues away

For ALS patients, to be freed from our ALS prisons we would gladly hop on that train and let that lonesome whistle blow our blues away.

The old railroad gate with a historic guard house behind
Some prisoners managed to escape from Folsom Prison. For ALS prisoners, those that escape either die or they were misdiagnosed. But we are all hoping and working toward a cure

Those of you who know Paul and Stan and know how their minds work together will see the humourous mild irony in this picture of them in front of Folsom Prison.

Like the prisoners enjoying Johnny Cash’s concerts, ALS patients can continue to enjoy music too, because hearing is not affected. On Tuesday we enjoyed Andy’s Reno Philharmonic Youth Orchestra concert with my dad and Anita and Stan’s cousin Lisa. It was amazing to hear the quality of sound coming from the students in the three orchestras. The students range in age from 7th to 12th grade. Andy’s orchestra even had ballet dancers for Aaron Copeland’s Rodeo which was written as a ballet.

Andy is second chair viola, right in front of the conductor

On Friday I had my salivary gland Botox injections and my ALS clinic appointment at UCSF. My takeaways:

  • Botox – we had a long talk with the doctor about my mucous problem and drooling when the Botox wears off and he adjusted the dose and made my next appointment in ten weeks instead of twelve 
  • Nutrition – I am maintaining steady weight which is good. It was recommended that I add Senna once a day to try to regulate my bowels.
  • Neurologist – she verified my slow progression and referred me to an Ear, Throat, and Nose Specialist for my allergies.
  • Speech – I told her that I never want to be unable to communicate. She gave me a low tech letter board like the one my mom had but this one has a laser pointer that can clip to glasses or a visor and it has commonly used words on it. My mom’s only had letters and we had to point to each letter until she nodded. I now realize how much mom had to say but she could not. I remember when she wanted to tell me something and she spelled out I love you. I have enough trouble saying all I want with my electronic text to speech.
  • Social Worker – we discussed upcoming travel and she facilitated a letter for the airlines and TSA so I can carry my medical equipment on the plane with me. I had all of my equipment with me so the letter contains all the serial numbers.
  • Respiratory – we did not attempt the forced vital capacity or other normal measurements because of my vocal chord involvement in my breathing. But she did measure my normal breathing CO2 output because I have been a little more breathless doing housework, and ordered overnight pulse oximeter study, and increased my Bipap pressures because I somtimes wake up with headaches.
  • Research Project – we had participated in a blood draw research study at the last clinic visit where I was the patient and Stan was the control. This time we each had to fill out a questionnaire. 
  • Blood work – it was nice to be able to go downstairs and get it done 

We are blessed to have a wonderful relative to stay with – Stan’s dad’s cousin Julie. We love her and she lives close to UCSF.

Thanks for another great visit Julie!

I am on the slow train to the ALS prison. I don’t know why my progression is slow. But I am a patient fellow for the ALS/MND International Symposium in Boston starting Friday and I will represent all ALS patients. Please send me your questions and comments for researchers and I will try to get answers. You can comment on this blog or on Facebook or on Twitter.

I will not write a blog next Monday. But I plan two Boston blogs: one from the patient fellow perspective and one from the visiting family perspective. I will be visiting my aunt and uncle the first night and my godmother the last two nights including a lunch with my mom’s cousin, with the conference in between.

Thanksgiving in the U.S. – what I am thankful for

Last Thursday, November 23, was Thanksgiving in the U.S. It is a traditional four day weekend but our local school district added the day before a few years ago, so now it’s a five day weekend. 

We drove to my sister Beth’s in California on Wednesday. She lives south of San Jose, in San Martin. My dad and stepmother, Anita, also drove from Reno. Beth and her husband Jamie have a beautiful home overlooking the CordeValle golf course and a vineyard. Jamie’s sons Phillip and Jack were there too. Because of not quite enough beds, Stan and I stayed at the golf club.

The view from our room.

We had a lovely Thanksgiving dinner at the club.

The beautiful menu – the food was equally beautiful. Jamie’s last name should have a capital B. That is the opposite problem from ours – the small d Macdonalds.

My dad, Phillip, Jamie, Jack, Beth, me, Stan, Andy, and Anita

Although I could not eat the turkey or any of the other wonderful food, I got into the turkey day spirit by drawing a turkey on my feeding tube. Thank you Laura Furumoto for the idea!

We went around the table and each said one thing we are thankful for. Among the comments: indoor plumbing, antibiotics, the first amendment, and the family we were sharing dinner with. Although it is hard to prioritize what I am thankful for, I said I am thankful to still be able self care after nearly two years with ALS. That is not just selfish because it impacts my son and husband greatly. I also seconded the comments about being thankful for everyone at that table. In addition, I am thankful for all of our relatives who we were not with on Thanksgiving.

I am thankful for my friends. Erika and her daughter Maddie came up from Eldorado Hills and spent Friday night and part of Saturday with us. Andy had to sell Christmas trees at his Boy Scout lot at Shoppers Square. Erika bought a tree and I bought a wreath. We will be with Stan’s dad and stepmother for Christmas so we don’t need a tree.

Marvelous Maddie with our wreath
Erika and Maddie with the tree on top of their car to drive over Donner Summit, with Andy and Cooper, who sold her the tree.

Erika even hung the wreath for me.

There are so many friends I am thankful for: the ones from my elementary school, the ones from high school, the ones from college and grad school, and all the friends I have met since I moved to Reno, and also the ones I met online that have become flesh and blood friends.

I am thankful for Radicava and the hope it brings for slower progression of my disease. I am thankful for all the researchers around the world who are working for an end to ALS. I am thankful for all the people who work in ALS clinics to help ALS patients have better quality of life. I am thankful for all the wonderful people with ALS and the wonderful caregivers I have met through ALS fundraisers, Facebook, and our local support group. I am thankful for the people who facilitate our support group.

I am thankful to be a patient fellow for the ALS/MND International Symposium in Boston December 8th through December 10th. I again encourage anyone with questions or comments about anything related to ALS/MND that you want the researchers to hear, please send me your questions and comments. I will be your voice at the conference. Again, you can comment on this blog or on Facebook or on Twitter.

I am also thankful for a fun Twitter interaction. The father of neurology is Jean-Martin Charcot, a brilliant doctor in the late 1800’s in France who first identified and classified ALS, MS and other neurological diseases. Well, Jean-Martin Charcot is on Twitter and he shared my blog! I could not agree more!

Fun at Corey’s Crusade and Radicava Round 1, Days 1 through 10

On October 21 we went to Clairmont Country Club in Piedmont, California for the annual Corey’s Crusade fundraiser for ALS TDI. Corey was diagnosed in college. This was his 10th annual party (He is now 31). Every year the party has had a different theme. For this party we could choose a theme for a costume from any of the previous 9 themes.

Margaritaville, Safari, the Beatles, Masquerade, Midnight in Paris, Western, Super Hero, Havana Nights, and Purple Rain.

Stan was a Parrot Head for the Margaritaville theme and Andy chose Purple Rain. I was a superhero of sorts, the Beauty who Killed the Beast.

Andy added round purple sunglasses and purple beads that they had at the party. You will have to wait for Halloween for a good photo of my costume. 
A selfie we took on the way in
With Jen from ALS TDI. We love you Jen! You can see the giant gorilla hand around me. But I promise a better photo on Halloween.

It was a great party where we saw friends and met many nice people. And I am sure they raised a lot of money. We stayed in Walnut Creek because we had to be back in Reno for the 1 pm show Beautiful – Carole King the Musical. I did my Radicava infusion and ate my feeding tube breakfast while Stan and Andy went down to the hotel breakfast. Then we packed up quick and hit the road. We made it by 12:55 pm. This was an 85th birthday present for my dad. It was nice to share such a wonderful show with my dad and Anita and Stan and Andy. Even Andy liked the show.

I have now completed over a week of Radicava. The first few nights I felt that I was sleeping better. I have been remembering dreams again. But by the 4th and 5th day I was having runny nose and lots of thin post nasal drip. There was so much I thought it must be an allergic reaction. We notified Searchlight of a possible reaction. But the next day Stan talked to two different pharmacists from Option Care. They said that it is possible to have an initial reaction to port medicine and it would go away with time. They also said see how I feel on the off weeks. So I loaded up on Benadryl and Sudafed, and I am still hoping for a freeze. I am watching those low overnight forecasts. Come on cold weather!

I can’t swim until a month after my port surgery, which will  be November 11. I can’t wait to get back in the pool. I feel better when I am doing all those range of motion exercises. I will have to start doing them at home for the next two weeks. For the next round of Radicava we have a little more flexibility. It will be ten of 14 days so we can do 5 days on then take the needle out and I can have two days to swim and shower without plastic wrap, and then do the second 5 days. We looked at the November calendar and maximized the days I could swim. I also will explore ways to cover the needle so I can do aqua fitness and stay in shallow water.

My friend Erika came up from Eldorado Hills, California for a quick visit. She learned how to do my infusion. I am able to do the infusion myself now but someday I may need help.

I am so blessed to have wonderful friends and Erika is the best of the best!

I’ve been out walking….I don’t do much talking these days

I’ve been out walking

I don’t do too much talking these days

from These Days by Jackson Browne

The second line of this song states the obvious: My Bulbar onset ALS has taken away my ability to speak. But the first line is approriate for the last week too, as you will see. 

On Friday last week Stan and I drove to San Francisco for my 11:30 A.M. Botox appointment at the UCSF Movement Clinic on Divisadero. Google maps sent us across the San Rafael Bridge and Golden Gate Bridge, so we avoided the ever present traffic jam in Berkeley. On the way down we were listening to KQED public radio about the planned white supremacist rally at Chrissy Field the next day. And then we heard about all the counter protests planned, so there would be lots of places to avoid on Saturday.

This time I had a higher dose of Botox in my parotid glands, top and bottom. Then for the first time, I had injections in my maxillary glands, under my jaw. The injections really sting when they go in. As I write this, it seems I can finally discontinue my Robinul, which takes water out of your saliva and other places in your body too. I have really disliked the effect on my eyes – either too dry or too teary. I hope my eyes go back to normal. I am trying to get used to this new saliva situation – a little maxillary dribble, the rest of my mouth dry, and post nasal drip that collects in the back of my mouth.  

We moved on to my 1 P.M. appointment at the ALS clinic on Parnassus. This was another appointment with no real changes. I got some suggestions such as probiotics to control the diarrhea that often comes with tube feeding. I also got a prescription for a liquid mucous reducer because mucous collects in the back of my mouth and then I can’t breathe through my mouth, which is ok as long as my nose is clear.  But my nose is not always clear. So far that new med works well with my cough assist machine and suction. I don’t want to carry those around with me but I might have to. We did get nabbed for a research blood draw, where Stan would be my control. We were happy to participate. I don’t know why I am still walking and moving with no limb involvement even after a year. It is a rare form of ALS I am told. I can only attribute it to luck but I will do my best to help find a cure while I am able to be active.

After finishing after 5 pm, as usual, we headed to cousin Julie’s in Outer Sunset near the southwest corner of Golden Gate Park.

Her house is the most beautiful in the neighborhood.

Big Junipers in front of Julie’s house.

We watched the news about the rally being cancelled. In my opinion it was all a publicity stunt.

On Saturday we had a lazy morning and then stayed in Julie’s neighborhood anyway, with a walk through the park. I had never been through that part of the park before and it was cool. Julie is a horticulturalist, so she could tell us about many of the plants and trees.

We saw bison, which was a surprise for me. Then we saw the fly casting ponds, another surprise. 

Wedding photos by the fly casting ponds.
An apparent professional woman fly caster practicing
Stan with a flower to go with his shirt that he picked up off the ground.

My allergies were bad walking through the park but I still enjoyed it immensely.

We had an early dinner at the favorite Thang Long Vietnamese Roast Crab restaurant 3 blocks away and had a leisurely walk home.

Stan carrying Roast Crab leftovers.
An intolerant sign in a store window – very San Francisco!
A bookmark Julie had. Truly profound words from Jimi.

When we got back to Julie’s she shared some photo albums with photos of Stan’s great grandparents and her grandmother (Stan’s great grandfathers sister), plus photos of Stan’s grandfather and his siblings.

Stan’s great grandmother, Katie, and great grandfather, Billy. Billy was from Scotland and moved to New Zealand for mining work and that’s where he met Katie. Stan’s grandfather was born in New Zealand.

There was also a photo pamphlet of the exhibition for which the Palace of Fine Arts and several other palaces were built. This was interesting to me because we had learned about the exhibition when we visited the Palace of Fine Arts on Segways a few weeks before.

The Palace of Fine Arts was built as a temporary structure made out of chicken wire and Paper Mache, since beautifully restored with more durable materials.

Sunday brought another lazy morning. 

Beautiful flowers from Julie’s garden in our room
Sunflowers in the bright, sometimes sunny, kitchen. We were visiting in “Fogust” as they refer to August in San Francisco, and we were in the foggy part of town.

Stan picked out all the leftover crab to use in a beautiful breakfast of crab benedict that smelled good.

In the afternoon. we walked in another part of the park I had not seen before. Since I moved to Reno in 1985, I have been to San Francisco hundreds of times, and it’s cool that there are still so many hidden pockets that I can explore for the first time.

This windmill is right across the street from where I started the San Francisco Rock n Roll Half Marathon. It was dark when we started and I did not notice the two windmills.
In the spring, this is a tulip garden

After dinner at Julie’s, we moved to a hotel closer to my Monday through Wednesday research appointments.

I participated in a number of studies at the UCSF Memory and Aging Center, all related to the C9ORF72 gene mutation I have that can cause ALS, Frontal Temporal Dementia, or both.

On Monday I was scheduled to have an MRI. When I had my brain MRI pre diagnosis, my claustrophobia caused me to bail out of the MRI as soon as they put the cage on my head. I then had a rescheduled MRI under anesthesia. When we began looking at research and clinical trials, I made a promise to get over my MRI claustrophobia if I participated in any that required MRI.

First I had to sign a lot of consent forms. Shoshana was our study coordinater, and she was wonderful to work with. While I was signing consent forms, Dr. Nick Olney came in with his own consent form. He is researching nuerofilament-light and a cervical spine imaging method called phase sensitive inversion recovery as ALS biomarkers. Dr. Catherine Lomen-Hoerth, the director of the UCSF ALS Clinic, had told him that I was coming for research and with my unusual ALS, limited to the Bulbar region, he was interested in my spine. His dad, Richard K. Olney, MD, was the former director of the UCSF ALS Clinic and a renowned ALS researcher who developed ALS himself and died in 2012. So the younger Dr. Olney is highly motivated by his dad. He was very understanding of my claustrophobia, claiming to have it himself. He suggested I try Atavan, which we could pick up at Walgreens at lunchtime. I had my brain MRI scheduled for 1 P.M. and Dr. Olney had scheduled his for 5 P.M. So, it was a great day to overcome my phobia, with two opportnities.

I had blood drawn after the consent forms and then we went off to Walgreens and lunch.

For the first MRI I requested meditative music. I closed my eyes and didn’t watch the cage being placed over my head or myself being pushed into the tube. When I did open my eyes, I could see the MRI tecnician and Stan in the mirror. I meditated using the body scan method we had learned at the Mindfulness Course we took at St. Mary’s Health and Fitness Center. The technician checked in with me between each scan, asking for a thumbs up if I was ready to go on. I only came out once to wipe out my mouth. I pushed through the rest if it with my omnipresent napkin in my mouth. Stan was asked to do his Caregiver Interview while I was being scanned. He was able to get on the microphone and say goodbye and flash our ASL “I love you”, which I was able to return.

After the MRI, I  had the first part of a neurological exam, and then it was time for MRI number 2.

With Dr. Nick Olney, no claustrophobia this time!

This MRI was a little different because the table was moved between scans and even shaken at one point. They were good about telling me how long each scan would be and made sure I was good to go. They told me I actually fell asleep toward the end. We finished after 6 P.M. and were about the last to leave the building. It shows the dedication of these researchers to help people with ALS even if it means working late. And I was successful at overcoming my claustrophobia, which I consider a victory.

We met our friend Roy at our hotel. Stan used to work with him and he is now working in San Francisco.

It was great to catch up with a good friend.

On Tuesday, first I completed the neurologic testing with Dr. Dana McDermott. Dr. Olney came in and did his own assessment.  Then I had cognitive testing; we had a family history meeting with Joanne, the genetics counselor; more cognitive testing; then a Family Conference, with about about 15 people around a big table. Dr. Adam Boxer led the meeting. Everyone introduced themselves and it was an international group. He explained that I was participating in several studies, specifically 

  • ARTFL (Advancing Research & Treatment for Frontotempemporal Lobar Degeneration) program based at UCSF.
  • Frontotemporal Dementia: Genes, Images, and Emotion

    My C9ORF72 repeat expansion genetic mutation has resulted in ALS. For many of my ancestors, it resulted in FTD. One of the things they are trying to figure out is why the there is a such a difference in gene expression even in the same family. I will not receive any information from this study, although I did find the cognitive testing to be easy. I will come back in a year for follow up.

    After the family conference we were free to leave (5 P.M.) When we got back to the hotel, I went to the pool and did my aqua fitness. It was really nice to be exercising.

    On Wednesday, we completed the research with a Lumbar Puncture or spinal tap, which sounds worse than it is. You can decide yourself after you see the photos. They put on music for me and this time it was Jackson Browne and the first song was These Days. Of course the second line stuck with me: I don’t do much talking these days, because it’s true. The first line also stuck with me because I am blessed to still be walking. So now you see one of the random ways my mind comes up with themes for this blog.

    But now, time for the lumbar puncture. They had me sit with my head on a pillow on a table.

    Dr. Dana McDermott getting ready to sample my cerebral spinal fluid.

    First she numbed my skin, then the layers below, and then stuck the needle in. I felt shooting pain in my left sciatic nerve, and when I reacted she asked if that was what is was. When I nodded she said she would move over a little. I didn’t feel anything else.

    Sampling the CSF. I requested that they sample some extra to send to Cedars Sinai, so I would not have to go back to L.A. for a second lumbar puncture. One spinal tap for two studies sounded good to me.

    After the spinal tap, Dr. McDermott asked if i would do it again and I said yes. It really was not bad at all. This is good because the antisense drug therapy that will go into safety testing soon will be administered directly to my cerebral spinal fluid. After the spinal tap, I got to rest and my awesome sweet husband fed me my breakfast.

    Then we had a language test that was made fun by Ariane, a speech pathologist from Australia. 

    She looked in my mouth with her torch, I mean flashlight. I told her that we had been to New Zealand, so we were used to the language differences, and that Stan’s grandfather was born there. She said to him, “oh you have kiwi blood, that explains a lot”. And my jokester husband teased her about escaping from the penal colony. I said that we called flashlights flashlights when we were in New Zealand. There was a Serbian intern observing and I asked her how to say flashlight in Serbian and she couldn’t remember so she Googled it. Another funny part was when Ariane sounded out words phonetically to see if I could understand that context. She tried to do P O T but with her Aussie accent I had no idea what word she was saying. She asked Stan to read it and I got it easily. She said that sound is really hard for her to say the American way. There were other laughs but to describe them would give away too much of the study.

    Then we got information about donating my brain, which we opted to look over later. Then we were done and we had lunch and drove home.

    I am passionate about helping to find a cure for this genetic mutation, as well as a cure for all types of ALS, so I am doing all that I can.

     

    Eclipse exceeded expectations in every way 

    Who would go to a baseball game with fireworks after, the night before leaving vey early on a Great American Solar Eclipse trip? A busy family that had to squeeze in a family night on the only available night this month. Our local Reno Aces (AAA Arizona Diamondbacks) were playing the Sacramento River Cats (AAA San Francisco Giants). Andy’s allegiance was torn between the local beloved Aces and the AAA team for our beloved Giants.

    We were seated on the home plate side of the Aces dugout. Andy went down there at the end of the game and asked if he could get a bat. He got one that was in the trash – he said the player tapped it on the ground and gave it to him and said it’s not broken. When we examined it later, it had two rectangular dings in it. Baseballs don’t make rectangular dings, so we realized this bat had probably been used to hit something in the dugout in anger.

    Andy with his prize bat. The best souvenirs are free. My camera was still focused for fireworks, hence the blurry photo. 

    When we got home, Andy said, ‘That was fun!”  We all had fun!

    It turns out that fireworks were the perfect prelude to a truly amazing trip. Andy had to stay home for school, Cross Country practice and orchestra commitments. Our friends Erika, Paul, and Maddie from Eldorado Hills, California picked us up for the road trip to Idaho. We stopped for lunch at The Griddle in Winnemucca, where I ate breakfast every day when I was in Winnemucca for work 20 some odd years ago. Memories!

    This car was parked next to us:

    We didn’t yet realize that epic was the perfect word to describe our trip too.

    When we got closer to Idaho, Erika, who grew up there, was amazed to to see a steady line of cars going north on a road where cars are usually few and far between.

    We arrived at Erika’s parent’s beautiful home in Parma, Idaho, in time for dinner, which included fresh sweet corn picked right out the back door. After dinner we relaxed on their patio.

    Bill and Pat with granddaughter Maddie walking between, armed with a salt gun to kill flies,
    Stan and Paul
    Erika and her dad

    John and Thien arrived from Granite Bay, California after exploring Boise and having dinner there.

    Maddie hung out inside, writing. A girl after my own heart.

    Bill’s brother, who lives down the road, had gone to the family cabin for the Eclipse, so Pat and Bill went down the road to sleep so Stan and I could have their Master bedroom. This was incredibly kind of them.

    But Bill was back the next morning, making huckleberry pancakes.
    Thien and John had recently returned from New Zealand where their son Alex is spending a semester. While there, Thien found the butter she grew up with in Viet Nam. She said when she was a kid she didn’t know the butter was from New Zealand. She brought home 8 cans.

    After breakfast, Bill, who was born and raised in Parma, took the guys on a scouting tour to pick out our viewing site for the total eclipse. Maddie helped her grandmother in the kitchen.

    Pat, Erika, and Thien

    After the guys got back, they worked on their eclipse viewing mechanisms.

    Perfecting the projection screen.”We found the corona!”, notice the beer bottle.

    Then we went for a great Sunday lunch at the Parma Ridge Winery.

    We played musical chairs so we could talk with others in the group. I had been next to Maddie, conversing with her. Stan asked what was going on over there and this was my response: Maddie and I were whispering.

    The beautiful view across the Treasure Valley

    Erika bought John and Thien, and Stan and I, souvenir Eclipse wine glasses,

    Thanks Erika, for the beautiful wine glasses to remind us of a wonderful trip with friends we love!

    After lunch, Bill took us on a tour of the Parma farming areas. This area grows crops for seeds to sell.

    This would be considered an abandoned field in Nevada, but here it is a field full of alfalfa seeds ready to be harvested next month. The sheds are for leaf cutter beehives.
    Hops is a major crop in the area.
    Bill teaching us all about hops.
    Stan was so hoppy! He loves hoppy beer.

    more teaching

    It was so interesting to learn about seed farming from a true expert. As we headed back to Pat and Bill’s home, I said, “please keep driving. I love learnimg,”

    When we got home, Erika saw in her news feed that Neil DeGraase Tyson looked for the place most likeley to have clear skies for viewing the total eclipse snd the best ice cream, and he was spotted in Boise ice cream shops. That made us feel good about our location.

    The next day was the Great American Solar Eclipse. We left at 6 a.m. to try to beat the crowds. Traffic was light. We drove many miles on a dirt road to Paddock Valley Reservoir.

    This turned out to be the perfect viewing spot. It was beautiful.

    There was a group camping on the beach so we went to the boat ramp. We had a few hours before the event to get set up.

    Paul getting solar binoculars ready. (photo by Erika Peters)

    There was even a bathroom! A few other people trickled in, including a high school astronomy and geology teacher. Everyone in our area was from nearby in Idaho. Erika knew some of the families from growing up in Parma. It was a far cry from the masses of humanity I was expecting, and that’s a good thing. 

    Our group, sans Maddie in the car, ready for the show.

    The projection screen attracted lots of interest. I set my camera on auto on a tripod and captured different moments of the moon’s passage. I am glad the projection screen was in my photos.

    A dad with two sons, checks out the projection screen
    These people told their little girl that the circle on the projection screen was a cookie with a bite out of it. The sunspots that showed up on the projection were called raisins

    (photo by Erika Peters)

    The two minutes of totality can’t be described by words or photos. I will try, but you really need to go find your own total eclipse to fully understand. Google future total eclipses and plan it. 
    First some pre totality notes:

    • I predicted that I would be the only silent one during totality. since I can’t speak.
    • We told everyone that you could take your solar glasses off during totality. A guy said, “Says who?” The answer was “NASA, and we believe them.”
    • A guy came by and asked John if he was the smartest guy in the group. He said, “I am pretty smart, but when I have questions, I ask him,” pointing at Stan. The guy then appointed Stan captain of the parking lot with the job of telling everyone when they could take their glasses off.

    So then totality. Two unbelievable minutes. I was not quiet. I squealed and was giddy. John had goosebumps. The cows stopped mooing.

    First I will share some photos of the show in the sky.

    This is pretty much what we saw in the sky, looking up without glasses. (Photo by Ken Gephart)

    This is my favorite raw photo because you can see solar flares. (photo by John Russell)

    My auto exposed (long exposure) photo doesn’t give you the true light level. We could see light to the north and the south but the sky in the shadow was dark. It actually looked like late twilight.

    When the sun came out from behind the moon, we were all high-fiving each other, as if we had achieved a victory. Stan said it was the best day in his nerd life since the first man on the moon. Most people left soon after totality, but the dad with the two boys went fishing. We hung around a little longer.

    (photo by Maddie Peters)

    Then we drove back to the Gotsch home via back roads, passing over the I84 freeway that was bumper to bumper. 

    We made it back to the farm after the eclipse and had an adrenaline letdown. I was totally pampered by Maddie who gave me a pedicure.

    Pedi by Maddie

    And then the long drive home on Tuesday. This time John and Thien caravaned with us, and we stayed in radio contact. We all ate lunch at The Griddle.

    In Winnemucca, we passed the giant Idaho potato. Erika was so excited she called her dad. She had never seen it before.

    The Giant Idaho Potato in Reno. (photo by Elizabeth Cummings)

    We had the perfect setup – Paul driving with Stan in shotgun seat, Erika and I in the back seat, and Maddie in the way back, watching movies or sleeping. Stan and Paul kept a conversation going between them, which left Erika and I to have a “whispered” Boogie Board conversation. It was a girlfriend pow wow and it was awesome.

    It could not have been a nicer trip, thanks to the Gotschs, the Peters, and the Russells, and of course the sun and the moon. It was wonderful trip with people we love.

    Party, Progess and Plans

    Andy went backpacking with Boy Scouts from Mt. Rose Highway to Spooner Lake on the Tahoe Rim Trail. Both Stan and I would have loved to go along but our backpacking days are over. Thankfully one of the dads who went along took photos.


    Photos by Shane Sykes

    Andy had fun and he said it was beautiful – that is Lake Tahoe behind him. He left Saturday morning and got back Sunday afternoon.

    We left Sunday morning and flew to Las Vegas for Stan’s dad’s birthday party. I was looking forward to no pat down going through security because I already had breakfast, and all my food was in my checked luggage. But I learned that my wireless keyboard and Boogie Board now count as electronics bigger than a cell phone that must be taken out. Maybe someday I can get through without the time consuming and personal space invading extra search.

    When we arrived, Stan’s brother Scott and his granddaughter Lillee were already there from Grand Junction, Colorado. Cathy, Stan’s stepmom, and Lillee were in the pool.

    Stan’s dad, John, enjoying a visit with his sons, Scott and Stan.
    Everyone listening to John.

    John loves to talk and you can find out interesting things from him, like this family story I had not heard before: Stan’s grandfather was a pharmacist in Texas and he dated Bonnie of Bonnie and Clyde before she met Clyde. John said his dad had a photo of himself with Bonnie Parker and he thinks he now has it and will look for it. We are all lucky that Clyde came along and snatched Bonnie away because Mac moved on to Kansas and fell in love with Olive, who worked in his pharmacy, and Olive was the nicest person you could ever meet (Stan’s grandmother).

    I took a little nap and then went in the pool with Lillers, as I call her. She is going into 4th grade. We had so much fun. There were wasps coming out of the bushes and Lillers would use the pool net to catch them and hold them under the water for a long time before they would drown. We devised a signal for wasp since I can’t talk. If I saw one I held up three fingers to make a W for wasp. She was quite good at catching them. She is a great swimmer and showed me some of her tricks. Then we played Ninja Warrior. There were two floats, two noodles, and two pool weights. She would have to run across moving floats or run across both floats and pick up the weights or jump over a noodle the long way on top of the floats. Another challenge was to jump into an oval formed by the two noodles. It was quite fun to play like that with a delightful girl. Love you Lillers!

    The next morning, John’s birthday, we had to say goodbye to Scott and and Lillee, but not before family photos. Stan’s sister Terry had arrived the night before so at least all three kids were there on the morning of John’s birthday.

    After they left to drive back to Colorado, Terry had a dental appointment so we dropped her off and John and Stan and I drove around delivering postcards from the hand delivery post office in the Galapagos. When we were in the Galapagos at the post office barrel, our guide took out the pile of postcards and read the destinations. We grabbed one from the Reno area and took 4 from the Vegas area knowing we would be visiting. It turns out the 4 cards were from the same family. At the first house the woman was painting her house and didn’t want her picture taken. She told us that 14 members of her family went on their Galapagos cruise on a small boat called the Darwin. She finally agreed to have her hand in the photo.

    At the second one, I was prepared to talk, but no one was home.

    We decided it would be better to leave the postcard sticking out under the door mat.

    The last two postcards were for the same address. A teenage boy answered the door. When he heard why we were there he was excited and said, “Mom come here, our postcards from the Galapagos!” Mom came to the door and said, “We were just talking about how the people had to go each house to deliver the mail.” She was the sister of the house painter and would not be in the photo either but the teenage son was willing.

    John said he enjoyed driving to parts of the town he had not seen before.  He also gave us a tour of the OLLI (Osher Lifelong Learning Institute), where he and Cathy spend a lot of time teaching. We finished our tour just in time to pick up Terry.

    Party

    That evening we went to Bahama Breeze for John’s 86th birthday party. About 30 of his friends attended. The restaurant was decorated very nicely with tropical art and seat covers with turtles, fish, or palm trees. The first thing Terry and I did was explore the place and take a selfie:

    The birthday boy with his son and daughter.
    Cathy and John at the conclusion of a very nice party.

    Terry drove us to the airport for our 10 pm flight. I had a momentary panic when I couldn’t find my license. I finally found it in a pocket of my purse. Again I was hoping to sail through security without my food. I dutifully removed my wireless keyboard and Boogie Board. But in the arms up scanner they saw my necklace and the clasps on my bra, resulting in invasive pat down again! Our flight was delayed 45 minutes, meaning we arrived in Reno at midnight rather than 11:15. That meant that on Tuesday I was moving very slow. But it was totally worth it for the family love and fun.

    Progress 

    I have been waiting for the newly approved drug Radicava, which is already available. We finally made some progress – confirmed that I am in the system so the benefits investigation can start, got a call from the infusion supplier which is the same as my food supplier, and got a call from the Nurse Educator who will be working with me for the first 9 months on the drug. It may still be a few weeks before I start, but the ball is finally rolling.

    Plans 

    We will be traveling up to the total solar eclipse in SW Idaho or SE Oregon on Monday with dear friends. We will stay at my friend Erika’s parents’ house with Erika, Paul, their daughter Maddie, as well as John and Thien. Paul and John work for the company Stan retired from, but in the Sacramento area. We have all become very good friends. I look forward to meeting Erika’s parents and add them to my list of friends. All 3 families have high school or college boys not able to join us.

    I am posting this on Friday instead of Monday because it is quite possible that cell phone networks will be overloaded with the hordes of people that flock to Total Eclipses. You can read about it here a week from Monday.

    You flew you Lear Jet up to Nova Scotia, to see the total eclipse of the sun – from You’re so Vain by Carly Simon.

    A Week of Love, Connection, Connections, and Hope

    While Andy was at camp, Stan and I had a busy week of travel. But first, after Andy left on Sunday, we had a lot of visitors. Stan’s friend Marc from work stopped by to visit. Then my neighbor and friend Amanda stopped by for a visit. Thanks Amanda! We are lucky to have your family as neighbors.

    Then Stan’s uncle Pete and his wife Mariana, from Corvallis, Oregon, visited. They were in town for the 150th anniversary of the two room old Huffaker School that is now at Bartley Ranch Regional Park. Pete and his sister Sally, Stan’s stepmom, both attended that school when it was at Huffaker Lane and South Virginia. We had a nice Italian dinner at Zozo’s with them.

    We had not seen them in many years so it was great to reconnect.

    Then Monday morning Stan and I took a 6:30 AM flight to LAX (Los Angeles). We saw this great Lexus while we waiting for our Uber.

    “Sorry Dad”

    We went for my screening appointment for the C9orf72 gene mutation biomarker study being conducted by Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in L.A. is the closest location to Reno for me to participate. We arrived at 8 and my appointment was not until 11 so we were able to have breakfast before getting our checked luggage. We Ubered to Cedars-Sinai even though we would be early. We had a nice chat with our Uber driver who was from Bogata, Colombia. His brother is a professional bike racer here in the U.S., so he had just watched the Tour de France like we had. He knew a lot about the successful Colombian riders in the Tour. He also did a good job of convincing us that we should visit Cartagena, Colombia, an old colonial city with many beautiful old buildings. He said Bogata is not safe, but it would be difficult for us at such high elevation too, since Stan and I both have lung issues. I still love Spanish so it was an enticing idea.

    At Cedars-Sinai, I signed the consent papers for the study, which will look at the C9orf72 gene mutation for each ALS patient in the study to see if there are differences in the mutation that correlate with the way and the age the disease presents itself. I went through a detailed medical and family history, had my current ALS-FSR measured (a measure of disease progression by loss of functionality), I had blood drawn, and I had a neurological exam. Stan also had to fill out a questionnaire about me.

    The gene mutation occurs as a repeat of part of the genetic code. If the repetitions are above a certain number the patient would eventually develop ALS or Frontal Temporal Dementia (FTD) or both if everyone lived to be 150. For those of us that were born with this mutation, it is believed that our bodies are able to overcome the damage the mutation causes until they can’t anymore, and then the disease manifests itself.

    This study must be completed prior to clinical testing of antisense gene therapy, which could begin as early as 2018. They said that a spinal fluid test is optional. I volunteered because I want to help advance the science as quickly as possible, for my siblings, cousins, son, and niece and nephews. The spinal tap will be scheduled at a later date.

    We were done in time to check into our hotel and walk to a nice lunch. Then Stan took a nap and I went to the pool and did my aqua fitness.

    Then the next morning we had breakfast by the pool.

    The plan after breakfast was to Uber to Orange County to visit with Lynne and Augie Nieto. Augie is Chairman of the Board of ALS TDI and Lynne is on the board too. We ordered Uber at our hotel and soon got a call from a driver who said she couldn’t get there due to a street closure for tree trimming. She asked us to walk two blocks to the other side of the tree trimming.

    So we did. You can see our hotel in the picture – the big building two blocks away. Then Uber called to tell us the driver was at our hotel. Big Uber Fail! They sent another driver, who picked us up and drove us to our destination. She had all types of phone charging cords which was nice. My only complaint was either really bad shocks in the car or really bumpy highway or both, because it was difficult to knit on the hour plus ride. We arrived just after 11.

    Lynne and Augie welcomed us to their beautiful house on a cliff over the Pacific Ocean. Augie has had ALS for 12 years. He started the fitness company that made Life Cycles. His Augie’s Quest raises millions for ALS TDI each year. We talked about fundraising we could do in Reno. Augie showed us the trailer for the new documentary about him, as well as a television news segment about him working with Project Walk, a group that works with spinal injury people to help them walk again. Augie is the first ALS patient they have worked with. He was able to walk his daughter down the aisle at her wedding, with some assistance. But even months before, that wasn’t imaginable. He worked out every day very hard to get to do that.

    I told Augie that I like his song, Augie Nieto by Five for Fighting. The song ends with a quote from Augie: “It’s not the breaths you take, it’s how you breathe.” Beautiful. They liked my ALS SUCKS t-shirt. I said I like that it has a turtle on it because we are still ourselves inside our shells of ALS bodies.

    They had a meeting at noon and we overlapped a bit so we met a lot of other very nice people.

    Then we had a very nice spot to wait for our Uber ride back to LAX.

    We thought it odd that were lifeguards so high up the cliff, but it turns out they were counselors for the Junior Lifeguard Camp for kids. Parents were coming to pick up their kids.

    We arrived at LAX at about 3 PM and our Uber driver told us that we were smart to get there before 3 because traffic later is much heavier. He said that 2 out of 10 rides that he takes to LAX, the passengers miss their flight due to traffic.

    This time we were changing planes in Las Vegas. We saw this sign at LAX.

    Can someone from visitRenoTahoe.com please explain what demographic group you are targeting? It wasn’t mine, because I don’t get it.

    Our flight out of LAX was delayed due to a crew delay. We ended up landing in Vegas when our next flight was due to depart. Tight connection. We rushed to the next gate and the gate attendant said, ‘The Macdonalds?” because we were the last two they were waiting for. He said they would wait for our bags too. Nice #Southwest. Even with this delay we arried in Reno on time.

    Then we had two nights and one day at home. It was a day of recovery for me. Stan didn’t get to rest. He met a friend for breakfast, went to wound care (wounds on his legs don’t heal due to Prednisone), and had lunch with another friend. He rested in the afternoon. I went to 5:30 pm Aqua Fitness. It was a great class – we kneeled, sat, and stood on boards which is a great core workout.

    On Thursday we drove to San Francisco to meet our friends Barb and Barry from Ottawa, Canada. Barb had visited us in Reno last fall. Barb was in San Francisco for a geriatic pharmaceutical convention which ended the day before. We checked into the Bed and Breakfast and then met Barb and Barry at the cocktails and hordeurves downstairs.

    This was the first time we met Barry. We all had a great time. That night we ate at a Morroccan restaurant called Mourad that was very nice and had great food  (it looked and smelled great to me).

    The beautiful wood at the entrance.

    Then on Friday, we did a segway tour of the city. Barb said they had always made fun of the segway tourists, but secretly they wanted to try it!

    We had great training, first right outside the segway tour place and then in a parking lot.

    Stan was the first to try. That is our great Irish tour guide behind him.

    We were in a group of 8, the 4 of us and a family of four with two teenagers. We all picked it up quickly. The change of balance is all in your feet so it seemed similar to regular downhill skiing. We stopped at a museum with arcade games from a hundred years ago and newer, along with the first photo op.

    Here we are with Alcatraz in the background.

    Then we went to the municipal pier, aka the Segway raceway. Stan really enjoyed this part.

    Barb with Coit Tower in the background

    We then went to the public parking lot by St. Francis Yacht Club where good pictures of the Golden Gate Bridge could be taken. It was partially fog covered.

    The next stop was the Palace of Fine Arts. I had driven by countless times but never stopped. It was so beautiful.

    And then, because our group all caught on quickly, we got to go up to the top of Lombard Street and ride down. This was a highlight for me – both the steep climb up and the winding ride down past all the beautiful houses and flowers. We were instructed to refer this as “chocolate” because not all the groups that left with us got to do that.

    After the Segway Tour, we had an In N Out Burger lunch so Barb and Barry could experience the California icon. Then Stan and I headed back to the Bed and Breakfast to rest and Barb and Barry went to the Exploratorium.

    That night we met Jen from ALS TDI and her husband Jimmy at a Thai restuarant. We had a lot of laughs. What a fun group.

    The next morning, after a final breakfast together, we had to say goodbye. We were headed back to Reno and Barb and Barry planned to take the ferry to Sausalito and walk back over the Golden Gate Bridge. They would fly to back to Canada the next day.

    My eyes are closed, oh well. It was a nice parting breakfast discussion, including when we could possibly meet again.

    We drove back to Reno and got there just in time for Stan’s wound care appointment. Another close connection. After that we went home and saw Andy who had arrived home from camp. As if we hadn’t already done enough this week we went out to Animal Ark for their Cheetah Dash. Animal Ark is an animal refuge that takes injured or abused wild animals. A few times a year they invite people out to watch the cheetahs run. They have devised a very fast pulley system to pull the lure that the cheetahs chase. The fastest one we saw went 50 mph.

    The best thing to come home to was our son.