Of the Earth, Love the Earth, and will return to the Earth

RIP Stephen Hawking (1942 – 1918), theoretical physicist and quick-witted man who lived with ALS for 55 years.

In the visible world, the Milky Way is a tiny fragment; within this fragment, the solar system is an infinitesimal speck, and of this speck our planet is a microscopic dot. On this dot, tiny lumps of impure carbon and water, of complicated structure, with somewhat unusual physical and chemical properties, crawl about for a few years, until they are dissolved again into the elements of which they are compounded.

Bertrand Russell

source: Astronomy Picture of the Day, September 4, 2011 In the Shadow of Saturn Image Credit: Cassini Imaging Team, SSI, JPL, ESA, NASA

Photo Explanation: In the shadow of Saturn, unexpected wonders appear. The robotic Cassini spacecraft now (2011) orbiting Saturn drifted in giant planet’s shadow for about 12 hours in 2006 and looked back toward the eclipsed Sun. Cassini saw a view unlike any other. First, the night side of Saturn is seen to be partly lit by light reflected from its own majestic ring system. Next, the rings themselves appear dark when silhouetted against Saturn, but quite bright when viewed away from Saturn, slightly scattering sunlight, in this exaggerated color image. Saturn’s rings light up so much that new rings were discovered, although they are hard to see in the image. Seen in spectacular detail, however, is Saturn’s E ring, the ring created by the newly discovered ice-fountains of the moon Enceladus and the outermost ring visible above. Far in the distance, at the left, just above the bright main rings, is the almost ignorable pale blue dot of Earth.

I have loved this photo of Saturn with the tiny dot of Earth far far away, since Neil DeGrasse Tyson used it in a presentation at the University of Nevada back in 2011. Seeing photos of how truly small we are in the Universe makes Bertrand Russell’s quote above even more poignant.

Seeing photos from Ash Wednesday last month reminded me of all my childhood Ash Wednesdays – getting ashes (of what?) spread in a cross on my forehead while the priest said, “Remember man, that you are dust. And to dust you shall return.” Being a geologist, I like the idea of being part of Mother Earth after death. If I donate my brain to ALS/FTD research, can I still be cremated and request where I want my ashes spread? I will have to research that.

From my mother-in-law Cathy, who is reading Neil DeGrasse Tyson’s Astrophysics for Busy People; to my mother-in-law Sharon, my sister-in-law Terry, and Keia (one of the foster teens I mentored), who are all into energy healing: it all comes down to energy and particles and waves.

But in the years between being dust and going back to dust, there is a lot of being human that takes us so far away from remembering that we are mortal.

Some people leave this earth suddenly, but those of us with fatal diseases get time to contemplate our mortality. It makes me sad to think of leaving all that I know about this amazing planet and all the people on it that I love, especially Stan and Andy.

And my cross to bear is this mucus problem. I finally got all cleared out and found a breathing technique to open up my throat by belly breathing (our natural way of breathing that gets closed up by the stresses of life). But then I thought my bipap was broken because I am waking up all dry, but it was not. I am waiting for a new mask (on order) which could be part of the problem. But it is now difficult to keep my mouth closed especially when it is dry and it gets dry from the air of the bipap even with the humidity turned way up. So I have to work to get all cleared out again each day. I have tried a chin strap but I have an overbite – orthodontics weren’t as good when I was 12 as they are today. So I have trouble keeping an airtight seal when sleeping. I have ordered another type of chin strap and we will see if it works.

I need to put a caveat on the breathing program I shared last week. It will only work for ALS patients who still can control their diaphragm and intercostal muscles between their ribs and their transverse muscles. I apologize for presenting it in a way that sounded like it could benefit all ALS patients.

So I did not get my usual winter break from mucus this year. Even if I figure out how to stay balanced, grass pollen will be back soon and my allergies will be back too. And this year I know that antihistamines cause thicker mucus, so I will have to stay away from them. My new breathing technique will help but I will be tied to my machines and home. But home is a nice place. After all these years, I am working on my office, which had been cluttered FOREVER. I got a good start – a new rug and new window bench and lots of recycling. But now I have taken a break from decluttering to get taxes done, but I will get back to the decluttering – I have big plans as long as I have enough time on Earth. And I can use a humidifier in this small room and help keep my mucus thin enough to swallow, usually.

I also decided to quit adding fiber to my diet – I think the added fiber was contributing to my reflux. And I will add walking before meals – I may need a pollen mask. I walked around the block on Monday before lunch and a few hours later I had thick mucus, that would only loosen up a tiny bit with guaifenicine. It is not like my usual allergy mucus. I will see my General Practice Doctor Wednesday afternoon. I hope I am not sick. In the meantime, I am using nasal saline spray in my mouth, along with guaifenicine, and I can get clear going through the tedious cough assist and suction routine – deep suction only in 10-second intervals because longer times risk lung collapse. I can only use guaifenicine every 4 hours but saline spray as often as I want. It tastes very salty to me because I have not had salt in over a year (except for that Pacific Ocean natural netti pot on New Year’s Eve with the vacuum cleaner suction).

There are flowers blooming outside, snow on the mountains, and my orchids are happily blooming in my south facing kitchen window. There is still a lot to enjoy in my remaining days alive on Earth.

Island life and ALS

On the Big Island of Hawai’i we enjoyed our grandson immensely.

photo by Jonika

And it was so nice to spend time with Chris and Jonika too.

I had a little snafu on New Year’s Eve – my suction machine broke. And it being Sunday and New Year’s Eve, no medical supply companies could be reached and wouldn’t be reachable until Tuesday. It is lucky I married a MacGyver like guy – he tried to fix the suction machine but he could not – “I could fix this if I was at home.” So in true MacGyver fashion he hooked it up to the vacuum cleaner so I could use it. It gave me an appreciation for the ALS patients in Puerto Rico and other islands after the devastating hurricanes. They were left in a worse state than I was – not a broken motor with a McGuyver guy around but no power for days. It is truly scary to be without suction when you need it badly.After a nice dinner at our condo with Jonika, Chris and Ollie; Andy decided to break the rules and swim after sunset on the last night of 2017.

Then he stayed up to watch the fireworks from the condo deck. But he is the only one.  Stan and I hit the sack before even midnight in Chicago. But I was up at 3 AM coughing and I saw the moonlight on the deck.

the now 2018 moon.

I did not feel I could turn on the vacuum at that hour of the night, because most condos had windows and sliders open. So I took some benadryl and went back to sleep. But I used the vacuum cleaner suction quite a bit on New Year’s Day.

Stan and I took it easy on New Year’s Day. But in the afternoon Andy walked to the pretty, rocky beach down the street.  He called to report that the waves were big.  So he came back and in the waning light of the first day of the new year we drove to Magic Sands Beach. Andy and I ventured into the water.

photo by Stan

I watched him bodysurf a couple waves and then I dove to ride one myself. But I forgot to close my mouth and got a mouthful of salty sea water. I came up coughing – not having a working epiglottis I can’t protect my airway. Plus I haven’t had salt in over a year, so it was very salty in my mouth. A woman asked if I was ok and Andy came over to help me.

photo by Stan

I bent down to write in the wet sand to tell Andy what happened.

photo by Stan

We walked back to where Stan was sitting on a rock.

photo by Stan
photo by Stan

After sitting a few moments, Andy and I went to rinse off in the outdoor shower. When we got back, I sat for a few minutes and realized that I had just done a natural netti pot – my sinuses were draining mightily. So we had to go back to the condo so I cough assist and use the jerry rigged suction. Then I slept for an hour but had to get up at 8 pm to eat dinner. I woke up coughing at 2 am and not being confident of sleeping with such irritated lungs or willing to turn on the vaccuum cleaner with all the windows open in the neighboring condos, I stayed up and finished my book. But at least I went in the ocean and it was exciting before scary.

It wasn’t until Tuesday after the holiday that we could work on a replacement for the suction machine. Our home Durable Medical Equipment (DME) company Bennett arranged for a machine from a Big Island DME.  It was delivered Wednesday. It is not portable.

It is heavy and has no case. And we are supposed to carry it back with us so Bennett can ship it back to Hawaii. So Stan called the company but all he got was a run around and voicemails. I texted our rep from Bennett and she had the local DME call Stan. He got a call back Thursday morning saying the DME didn’t have a portable suction machine. But they said they will look for one.

We went to the Hulihe’e Palace with Jonika, which we had not seen before.

This historic home was built in 1838. It belonged to the governor of the island of Hawai’i. When his son married into Hawaiian royalty it became a favorite retreat of royal families. It houses a collection of ancient Hawaiian artifacts and personal memorabilia of 19th century Hawaiian royalty, including beautiful koa wood furniture and bowls. There was also ancient jewelry and weapons. There was a very entertaining guide upstairs.

The view out of one of the first floor rooms.

After the palace tour we had a nice lunch in a new restaurant that Jonika had wanted to try.

the beautiful flower adorned food

Still dealing with mucous, I tried a medrol dose pack and a stronger antibiotic. I also had to refill my Xanax which I take for ALS anxiety which is a very real thing, especially after watching my mom go through it. I had a refill from my Reno doctor but in Hawai’i for controlled substances, only prescriptions written by Hawai’i doctors can be filled. So we went to urgent care Tuesday night and got the prescription – and will have to send the bill into our insurance company. And then we went to dinner.

a dinner conversation about 2018 expectations and goals

Another night we had a nice dinner at Jonika’s house with friends of theirs from Portland, Oregon. Jonika and Mike have been friends since riding the bus to middle school and high school from our house – he lived around the corner from us. Jonika made a pumpkin soup in a pumpkin that I heard nothing but raves about.

While Stan and Jonika were grocery shopping for the dinner party, Stan got a call from the DME that they had a portable suction machine, so they went and picked it up. It is the best suction machine I have had yet.

We babysat for Ollie quite a bit. He is a sweet helpful child until he is tired and I think he is growing this week – he is sleeping a lot and we see him learning new things.

Jonika’s work on phones for Seaquest, the boat company she works for, is wonderfully flexible. She can be at home or wherever and just has to answer phones and book trips on her iPad. She can get things done between phone calls. She can do this work in Reno too when she visits later this month. She also works in the office and does sales presentations for the company.
Despite his lethargic parents, Andy had fun. 

Chris took him  cliff diving (video by Chris):​

And Jonika took him zip lining.

Andy and I took Ollie to the pool.

It was a week of love, connection, and hope – hope that my sinus mucous would clear up. I could be reacting to the vog which is gases from the volcano. Vog and dogs and cats and pollen – my body reacts to the world I live in and I may be managing mucous the rest of my life. Allergies and sinus infections used to be  minor inconveniences but now I can’t blow my nose or cough or swallow well but I am still hopeful the problem will clear up, and in the meantime I will pick my nose and hack into cough assist and suck out mucous with suction and be thankful for electricity.

 Distraction vs Reality

A couple of my friends who blog about ALS and live in the northern hemisphere (Liz in Canada and Christian in Germany) have written about death from ALS in the last week. The days are getting shorter and the leaves are blowing off the trees. Halloween on October 31st with lots of skeleton decorations and Dia de Los Muertos in Mexico on November 1 (All Souls Day in the Catholic church) are holidays with roots in death even though now they are celebrations. So it makes sense that people think about death this time of year.

I am writing about distraction because it’s a coping method for dealing with a fatal disease. I like to be busy and get frustrated when my allergies cause me to have to be tied to my cough assist and suction machines. I must be allergic to sage brush now and that is a plant that spreads pollen in the wind and it will be flying around until we get a good rainy day. (Which might happen Wednesday if the current forecast is correct). Sagebrush is the state flower of Nevada and the hills around Reno are covered with it. I still have major post nasal drip that gets stuck in the back of my mouth. If I breathe through my mouth I breathe through mucous and can’t get a breath. That is why I am still using the napkin in my mouth. It forces me to breathe through my nose. I have a good nasal spray, Dymista, so I am usually able to keep my nose clear. I have a daily to do list and I try to do at least two things on it each day. So my daily to do list and managing allergies are a big part of distracting me from the realities of how this will end. ALS deaths are usually peaceful. My diaphragm will become less and less effective and then I will have difficulty expelling CO2 and I will sleep more and more. I won’t be gasping for breath. Not a bad way to die. My loved ones can be with me. I feel bad that it will be hard for them but I didn’t write this book and can’t change the ending.

I was disappointed to not be able to go to aqua fitness on Saturday November 11, the first day I could swim after my port surgery on October 10. My allergies were too bad. I have tried nearly every antihistamine on the market. Nothing keeps my throat clear long enough. The trick is to find something without major side effects: One that won’t dry my eyes too severely and one that won’t make me too drowsy. I am now trying Zyrtec and a new formulation of it called XYZAL.  It could take up to a week to be effective but my first 10 ml. dose was effective for about 4 hours.

It is ok to be sad about leaving this wonderful world, and we have to grieve at times. But I think it’s ok to carry on with life and do the things that make you happy while you can. I play piano and I knit and I do aqua fitness and spend time with family and friends and I want to do those things until I can’t anymore. 

But I was having my own pity party when I couldn’t swim on the first possible day back. And then I was inspired by a 30-year-old friend with ALS. Early  Sunday morning I read a blog post from Suuny Braus Erasmus who wrote about Franklin D. Roosevelt, who didn’t let paralysis from polio stop him from becoming the 32nd  President of the United States – which had been his goal before polio. Reading that gave me the kick in the ass I needed and I went to aqua fitness on Sunday morning at 8:45. For the first time I kept my napkin in my mouth the whole class and had to focus on nose breathing. It was not comfortable but I got the workout in and that feels good.

I am so inspired by so many younger people with ALS:

  • Sunny Brous Erasmus, diagnosed at age 28, met her husband at 29 and got married at 30 and blogs at sunnystrong.wordpress.com. She continually inspires me. 
  • Sarah Coglianese, diagnosed with ALS at age 33, who just won the Tradition of Excellence Alumni Award at Oak Park River Forest High School. She gave an impressive acceptance speech about empathy and how it could help many of the problems in this world. She has raised very large amounts of money for ALS research with her #whatwouldyougive campaign (which inspires empathy) and is a gifted writer who inspires ALS patients and others with her blog about ALS speed4sarah.com. Despite me being 18 years her senior, she is my mentor and friend. I went to OPRFHS with her aunt.
  • Corey Reich, who was diagnosed in college at age 21 and has raised lots and lots of money for research in his ten years with ALS and he is still a tennis coach at his high school.
  • Andrea Lytle Peet, who was diagnosed at age 34. She was a triathlete and she continues to compete in marathon races on her recumbent bike to raise money for ALS research and blogs at teamdrea.com
  • Osiel Mendoza, who was diagnosed in college at age 21 last year. He married his girlfriend a couple months ago – they have been a couple since 8th grade. He has already raised a lot of money for ALS research. He gave an inspiring speech at ALS TDI’s fundraiser in Boston a few weeks ago.
  • Eryn Criswell Blythe who was diagnosed at age 36 and has two young children. Her husband is her caregiver. She was pushed in her wheelchair in the L.A. Marathon last summer to raise money for research.
  • And Liz https://lizfeltham.wordpress.com and Cristian https://workandloveblog.wordpress.com are both younger than me I believe, and they both inspire me regularly.

These young people are taking what life has dealt them and are making the world a better place and moving forward with optimism. That is certainly enough to stop my 57 year old pity party!

The only picture this week is from Andy’s Cross Country banquet on Wednesday last week. He got a Varsity letter and he got a coaches award for his hard work and improvement. 

I am proud of him for working hard on running. Now he has to figure out how to keep his grades up while participating in a sport that takes so much time (practice 6 days a week). He wants to do track next semester but he will only be able to if he can bring his grades up this semester (family rule). He did it last spring to be able to compete in cross country so I think he can do it again if he can focus on school. Keeping him on track for track is a distraction too. Maybe all these young amazing people with ALS can inspire him too.
I don’t know when my ALS journey will end and I should be more hopeful since I am on the new drug Radicava, but the shorter days and allergy woes were bringing me down. At least we now know that I am probably not allergic to the Radicava since my symptoms have continued on the off cycle. And all I have to do is think of these young people with ALS and my personal pity parties will be over.

 

Fun at Corey’s Crusade and Radicava Round 1, Days 1 through 10

On October 21 we went to Clairmont Country Club in Piedmont, California for the annual Corey’s Crusade fundraiser for ALS TDI. Corey was diagnosed in college. This was his 10th annual party (He is now 31). Every year the party has had a different theme. For this party we could choose a theme for a costume from any of the previous 9 themes.

Margaritaville, Safari, the Beatles, Masquerade, Midnight in Paris, Western, Super Hero, Havana Nights, and Purple Rain.

Stan was a Parrot Head for the Margaritaville theme and Andy chose Purple Rain. I was a superhero of sorts, the Beauty who Killed the Beast.

Andy added round purple sunglasses and purple beads that they had at the party. You will have to wait for Halloween for a good photo of my costume. 
A selfie we took on the way in
With Jen from ALS TDI. We love you Jen! You can see the giant gorilla hand around me. But I promise a better photo on Halloween.

It was a great party where we saw friends and met many nice people. And I am sure they raised a lot of money. We stayed in Walnut Creek because we had to be back in Reno for the 1 pm show Beautiful – Carole King the Musical. I did my Radicava infusion and ate my feeding tube breakfast while Stan and Andy went down to the hotel breakfast. Then we packed up quick and hit the road. We made it by 12:55 pm. This was an 85th birthday present for my dad. It was nice to share such a wonderful show with my dad and Anita and Stan and Andy. Even Andy liked the show.

I have now completed over a week of Radicava. The first few nights I felt that I was sleeping better. I have been remembering dreams again. But by the 4th and 5th day I was having runny nose and lots of thin post nasal drip. There was so much I thought it must be an allergic reaction. We notified Searchlight of a possible reaction. But the next day Stan talked to two different pharmacists from Option Care. They said that it is possible to have an initial reaction to port medicine and it would go away with time. They also said see how I feel on the off weeks. So I loaded up on Benadryl and Sudafed, and I am still hoping for a freeze. I am watching those low overnight forecasts. Come on cold weather!

I can’t swim until a month after my port surgery, which will  be November 11. I can’t wait to get back in the pool. I feel better when I am doing all those range of motion exercises. I will have to start doing them at home for the next two weeks. For the next round of Radicava we have a little more flexibility. It will be ten of 14 days so we can do 5 days on then take the needle out and I can have two days to swim and shower without plastic wrap, and then do the second 5 days. We looked at the November calendar and maximized the days I could swim. I also will explore ways to cover the needle so I can do aqua fitness and stay in shallow water.

My friend Erika came up from Eldorado Hills, California for a quick visit. She learned how to do my infusion. I am able to do the infusion myself now but someday I may need help.

I am so blessed to have wonderful friends and Erika is the best of the best!

What sort of beast is man?

You belong among the wildflowers

You belong in a boat out at sea

Tom Petty – Wildflowers

Perhaps a better song to quote is U2’s Sunday, Bloody Sunday. The tragedy in Las Vegas was so unthinkable and horrific. We watched the first episode of Ken Burns’ The Viet Nam War this week. A veteran was quoted saying that there is a reason we are the dominant species on this planet and that people say the military turns boys into men, but no, he said, it is just a finishing school. That was a chilling comment to hear after Sunday. In another movie we watched recently there were mountain lions (scary) but the humans in the movie were much scarier. Our whole state was impacted by the tragedy Sunday. It is sad that our country can’t do more for mentally ill people and can’t come to consensus on gun safety. #BanBumpStocks 

Northern Nevada supports you Las Vegas. The love that poured out among those fleeing as well as the first responders and hospital staffers, as well as the response from the community at blood donation sites in both Las Vegas and Reno, shows the side of humanity I would rather focus on. #VegasStrong #NevadaStrong. I wish that everyone impacted somehow finds peace and recovery soon. I know it will be a long time coming. It affects every security guard in casinos in Las Vegas and in Reno, and many, many other walks of life too and every big city outdoor music festival, as well as the friends and family of the victims. And every victim belongs among the wildflowers or on a boat out to sea, instead of being killed by a human beast.

We also lost a rock and roll icon, Tom Petty, a week ago. I like his music and Stan and I saw him live in Reno many years ago. I chose those two lines from his Wildflowers song not only for the victims but also because I love to be outside among the wildflowers, but my seasonal allergies are really bad this year. I can’t cough or blow my nose or swallow well so I am beholden to my cough assist and suction machine. If I could go on a boat out to sea I could get away from the pollen.

I have had a lot of thick saliva. From the British MND Association website I got a PDF about dealing with saliva in ALS/MND.

I have been taking Pineapple and Papaya Enzymes to help with breaking up the thick saliva. The publication said pineapple juice could be swabbed in the mouth to help with the same thing. We had some pineapple juice, so I swabbed some in my mouth. I got a very quick reduction in thick saliva. But it only lasted about 5 minutes. So then I swabbed some more. And then some more. And soon I had swollen lips and felt as if I OD’d on antihistamines. This could be an allergic reaction. It turns out pineapple is a strong antihistamine. Even if it is not a pineapple allergy, I do not want to OD on antihistamine. I had been trying various combinations of anantihistamines and decongestants and expectorants, to find allergy relief and trying to keep track in my head. But there are way too many variables to keep track of. Plus I really want to find out which med is making my eyes uncomfortable. I messaged my doctor at UCSF to get her input. She agreed that I can methodically try discontinuing one med at a time, and stay off any discontinued for at least a week. I decided to start with Neudexta. I can stay off it and see if I am having psuedobulbar affect (inappropriate laughing and crying). If I am not having that symptom, then I can discontinue it completely. Four days off so far and nothing inappropriate. I am also documenting when I need my eye drops. Yes, I still need them, and yes I am still having allergy symptoms (sneezing – works better than cough assist! I appreciate that I can still sneeze), itchy eyes, runny nose. This could all still turn out to be my seasonal allergies. I am still hoping for a deep freeze soon!

I became empowered this week and decided to make my own phone calls. Stan does not have patience to wait for customer service to pick up and he gets frustrated with being passed on to another hold and phone tag is also frustrating to him. So I sat down with my Speech Assistant on my phone with my wireless keyboard and used our house phone to call our insurance company. I had pre-typed “My name is Margaret Macdonald. Please be patient while I type.” I waited on hold a long time and then I got the screener. I explained that I was calling because the accumulator that my providers see says I have not met my maximums but I have. So my doctors make me pay and then we ultimately get refund checks. Then I was connected with someone who could help. She said she could see the problem and she would send it their IT department. Then she said, “is there anything else I can help you with?” And I said, “yes. I am waiting for approval for a new drug and with my disease every day counts.” She said it is all approved and she would call Option Care, the infusion supplier, for me. Success!

Next I called Searchlight, the patient support group for Radicava – the new drug. Again after a long hold and with a pre-typed opening statement I talked with a customer service representative asking for my Patient ID Number and Case Number, and my status. I was transferred to my case manager. She had my benefit summary and she had already enrolled me in the copay support program. I should receive the benefit summary in the mail on Tuesday. Again success! So now I can make my own phone calls, and my husband will be less frustrated.

My allergy struggles and all my ALS struggles are so very minor compared to the hell created by the human beast in Las Vegas. Now if only we could turn the clock back to before that Sunday, bloody Sunday, night…..

  

Trying to Reason with Allergy Season

I never had allergies as a kid. They first hit me in my twenties after I moved to Reno. I was tested, and at that time I was allergic to grass, dust, and dead moths. Well, grass and dust are rather ubiquitous. In Reno the grass pollen season runs from February until November. 

Now with ALS, I can’t blow my nose or cough so I rely on my cough assist and suction machines and lots of Kleenex, which I use to catch my runny nose. But I am active too and it is not convenient to haul the machines around.

I was blessed with the last two Sundays in a row on the beautiful shores of Lake Tahoe. For a long time I have noticed a pine allergy because my allergies are usually even worse up at the lake. I wouldn’t give up those afternoons spent with family and friends but I pay a price with allergy symptoms. 

The ALS Association published an Ask the Doc: Q & A about allergies and ALS with Edward Kasarskos, MD, PhD, director of the ALS Center at the University of Kentucky.  You can read it here.

Dr. Kasarskos says hay fever is particularly difficult for ALS patients who can’t cough up secretions or swallow effectively. He recommends:

  • reduce exposure to allergens by closing windows, special filters for cooling and heating, and frequent vacuuming to minimize indoor dust and pollen.
  • keep hydrated to help thin your secretions. Use nasal sprays to moisten mucous membranes in your nose.
  • talk to your general practitioner about over-the-counter medications you can use, such as Claritin or eye drops or nasal sprays.
  • Check with your pharmacist for drug interactions.
  • Allergy shots may be an option but they can take months to be effective.
  • If you use a Bi-Pap, be sure to use humidified air.
  • Use cough assist.

This is all good advice, but the realities of it are not fun. First of all, my husband is always overheated and he likes windows open in the morning and at night. Second, staying hydrated and using nasal sprays and decongestants causes post nasal drainage that settles in my esophogus. Claritin helps keep my nose clear but does not help sinus drainage. So I have a choice between sinus headache all day, or post nasal drip all day. For the first time, when suctioning, I have had to use the small tubes that go all the way down my throat. Since I am not used to it yet it makes me gag and it makes my eyes water.

I was out to lunch with my friends Melissa and Sabine and I had my lunch and took my ground-up decongestant/exportant after. I also did multilple flushes to keed hydrated. Suddenly, I had mucous pouring down my throat making me nausous and my mouth was full of mucous and it was pouring out of my nose. I went through a ton of paper napkins for my nose and I kept wiping my mouth out with my napkin. Melissa called Stan who came up to the restaurant and by the time he arrived the decongestant had dried me out pretty well. I was rattled by the stress of that and thankful that I was with good, understanding friends.

Another problem is that the allergy meds also dry my eyes out. So I use eye drops, and I need them frequently.

I am anxiously awaiting a hard freeze. We have a cold front right now, and I just got a severe weather email saying that a freeze warning is in effect for tonight (Friday Sept 22, the first day of Autumn). This is very early for a freeze but I will take it.

Another problem is that the allergy meds can make my mouth uncomfortably dry. Also, all these allergy issues make me very tired. 

I don’t mean to complain and I am not looking for sympathy. I only want to show how difficult allergies and ALS can be.

We did make some progress on my Radicava appoval – my insurance company approved it and we met with a surgeon to install my port, hopefully next week. These approval calls always come on Friday, so I have to wait through the weekend to make more progress.

We also met with Social Security and found out that I will get nothing. I could pay for Medicare Parts A and B. But we decided to continue with the school district insurance that I can pay for since I got disability retirement from them. We also found out that Stan can apply for disability retirement, which won’t be as straightforward as ALS. He has sarcoidosis and we have a lot of paperwork to gather before next Friday, his next appointment. He will actually get more per month than he would if he takes regular social security at 62. So the extra work this week will be worth it.

I hope I am close to the end of trying to reason with allergy season. But usually that comes later. At least I am closer to Radicava.