Loved ones visit from Hawaii and positive changes ensue

There is so much about Jonika and Ollie’s visit that was wonderful. Jonika was helpful, cooking, cleaning, instigating organization for Andy in his bathroom, his room, and in his schoolwork. She even shared her knowledge from two years of weekly therapy to improve our family dynamics. And she also visited with friends and family.

Even Ollie (18 months) likes to help – he likes to shake my food and even pour it (but I can only let him ‘pour’ empty ones), and he likes to help with laundry, and he sweeps. It was great to watch him learn. I was packing up some things to give away that had to fit in the box a specific way. He would watch me put a piece in, then try himself and hand me the next one so he could learn how it fit correctly. He also loves to bounce on beds, swing, and rock in the rocking chair.

in the rocking chair with Granny M

And it was great that he knows some American Sign Language, especially now that I am learning some too. He and I communicate in facial expressions and hand movements, just like communication is done in ASL. When we visited Hawaii when he was only 3 months old, I was still verbal with only vowel sounds and that was all he could do too.

So far, no problem communicating with this young human although his verbal skills are increasing and all I can do now is a monotone sound.

Toddlers also bring home germs. Ollie threw up Thursday morning and by Saturday Andy, Stan, and Jonika were all sick. I had to go into mom mode and clean up Andy’s bed linens so I was exposed.

Andy convelescing on the couch watching the Olympics while Stan rallies himself to entertain Ollie

And sure enough, 48 hours after exposure I got the bug. But I was ready with my extension tube on my Mic-key button and an extra large plastic cup next to me all night. When I woke up with my button hopping up and down and I got that about to throw up feeling, I opened the tube into the cup. Even laying on bed it exploded in bursts into the cup. When I got up, I started with Gatorade and when that stayed down I did my meds. For new readers, you won’t remember my norovirus when I was still working. I could not stop vomiting and it would get stuck in my esophagus, burning away, until I could cough assist it out. That was only resolved with hospitalization. It was miserable and my esophogeal muscles work even less well now.

It was a snowy day, so Ollie got to go out and experience it for the first time. He was fine, walking around in wonder, until he fell and his hands got too cold. Then he cried and cried, and I think he was saying, “Take me back to Hawaii Mom!”

I had some more Gatorade and went back to bed. I slept a couple hours, then did cough assist and suction and had some more Gatorade. I kept the extension tube connected so I can monitor what comes out while I’m awake. By noon, I was able to tolerate one box of food.

My friend Alice stopped by to bring me some slipper socks, perfect for a snowy day.

In addition to extra family and friend visits during their stay (which were wonderful), Jonika had recommendations for our interactions with Andy. She has the unique insight of a 30-something adult, who is now a mom, and who spent four years being parented by us. One thing that really hit home was that we have to be role models, including cleaning up our cluttered areas if we expect Andy to keep his things uncluttered. So I worked on my office, which had been on my to do list for a long time. It is something that I have to do before we can do taxes. But this time, I am purging big time and I ordered a new rug to help motivate me. Another thing is to help Andy with time management, but only if wants help, and that has already helped more than once.

Jonika and Ollie left to fly back to Hawaii early on Wednesday morning. All three of us will miss them greatly.

Exciting New Research

(all photos by Jennifer Chase)

I was chosen as a patient fellow for the ALS/MND International Symposium in Boston in early December. I was looking forward to learning a lot and meeting researchers and the other patient fellows.

The day before we were going to fly across the country to Boston, my husband, Stan, was hospitalized with life threatening septic shock. This forced me to cancel my trip to the conference.

But through social media and the ALS/MND International Symposium phone app, I got a message from a woman named Jennifer Chase, who has the C9ORF72 gene mutation like me. Jennifer lost her mom (who had FTD then ALS) and sister to ALS and her sister was one one of the first commercially tested patients confirmed to have the C9ORF72 gene. Jennifer is a brave sister in that she decided to get tested herself. She does have the gene mutation and has been learning all she could since finding out and she has been participating in research studies. She was attending the meeting on her own and she agreed to send me photos and updates. I appreciate her so much because she allowed me to learn through her eyes. What follows is a summary of the updates she sent me.

the registration table

There was a display of ALS/MND patients from all represented countries, including the awesome Osiel Mendoza from the USA.

Jennifer also sent me a photo of the registration swag.

The swag included the Nature Outlook from which I quoted two weeks ago

And now her report on the first day:

The Opening keynote speaker, Dr. Jeffery Rosenfeld from Loma Linda University, spoke about the need for a new paradigm: the need to define and stratify as done in MS, epilepsy, and headache. Even if lines are drawn wrong at first it’s time to start. He also said that biomarkers are what need to be tracked in clinical trials. The patient’s functional rating scale (FRS) doesn’t give results quickly enough.

Then there were awards:

  • Humanitarian award to the guys that started the ice bucket challenge – Anthony Senerchia, Jr. (awarded posthumously), Patrick Quinn, and Pete Frates. Pete’s mom Nancy accepted the award.
  • Forbes Norris Award to Dr. Merit Cudkowicz of Massachusetts General Hospital (and Jennifer’s neurologist) for her passion in researching and caring for patients with ALS and finding the cure.
  • The Paulo Gontijo Research Award to Marta Van Blitterswijk, MD, Ph.D of the Mayo Clinic in Florida for her work attempting to understand the variability among patients with ALS, including age at which it starts, presence of dementia, diesease progression and survival. Most of her patient centered work has focused on the C9ORF72 mutation.

Then Jennifer sent me this photo of ALS TDI researchers. The two on the right are working on C9ORF72 research

She said the rest of the morning was good, although nothing specific to C9 was covered. The Symposium registration was the highest ever – 1281. The scientific sessions were packed. She even saw people on chairs outside the rooms. She said she thought there were slightly more people with ALS there than 2 years ago.

The first afternoon session had a lot about the nuclear pore membrane and C9ORF72. One of the sessions was about SRSF1 (a protein coding gene and nuclear export adaptor) and C9 as a potential way to block the deleterious C9 while allowing the good C9 to work. They are looking at three potential approaches in fruit flies.

She walked through the posters not during the poster session, because of being too tired – I know I would have been exhausted . She noted one that described ALS as the nice person’s disease, and the poster said it looks like some truth to that because the characteristics that make people with ALS nice may be associated with risk factors in lifestyle and occupation.

She went to the clinical trials session on Friday afternoon.

  • Mastinab – normal progressors with less than a 1.1 decline on their FSR showed a slowing of decline at highest dose. There are reports of study irregularities though.
  • Tirasemtiv failed but a related drug is still in trial.
  • Ibudilast – Jennifer said it was confusing. She said they are hoping it slows FSR decline but it needs more study.

Moving on to the Saturday morning session, there was a hopeful presentation on a mechanism to help drugs bypass the blood brain barrier.

She said the biggest deal was Frank Bennett who is Vice President of Research for Ionis, in Carlsbad, CA, which is one of two companies developing the antisense drug. It is already being tested on ALS patients with the first gene defect identified – SOD1 and Bennett said the trial is going well. He also showed a video of kids with Spinal Muscle Atrophy who have been treated and the results were amazing – they were able to meet developmental milestones that untreated patients never could.

Another takeaway was from a presentation from Dr. Michael Benatar of the University of Miami who has been doing pre-familial ALS research – there may be a biomarker sometime that can detect disease before it is obvious clinically which would be a window for treatment for carriers. That would be very exciting.

C9 ALS normally has an average progression rate, but there are subsets – one where there is little progression for years (10 or more years) and another subset where progression is brutally fast. The doctor who was doing extensive genotyping discovered that these brutally fast progressors have a “rare deleterious variant” of the C9 mutation – they all died within a year.

Jennifer also went to Dr. Nick Maragakis’ presentation on excersise. She said basically supervised exercise (stretching, resistance, or cardio) did not hurt the study group but it not help ALS either. But I know from experience that exercise can help quality of life.

Then on to Sunday, the last day. She said there was lots on basic C9 research. Dr. Marka Van Blitterswelk (who won the research award) spoke about her findings on post mortem studies of C9 FTD with and without ALS. It was all good science and increased understanding. This work could not have been completed without the brave C9 patients who donated their brains, and their brave families.

Dr. Nazem Atassi presented on a PET MRI study which is not C9 specific but he thinks it can be used for smaller, faster phase 1 and 2 trials because it has a strong signal.

Dr. Brown giving the closing remarks

The closing session speaker was Dr. Robert Brown, of UMass Memorial Medical Center in Worcester, MA, who has been studying ALS with a special interest in genetics for a long time. He said the C9 antisense trial will be coming up in late 2018 (although I have since heard it may be sooner, and I hope to participate).

I had two comments from family caregivers from my blog requests before the conference.

The first one is from the sister of an ALS patient in California. He was diagnosed in March with familial ALS. After finally getting approved for Radicava he changed his mind so he could apply for the Nurown Phase 3 stem cell trial, and one of the requirements was to not be taking Radicava in the 30 last days. His breathing is also declining quickly and he won’t qualify for the trial if his breathing is below 60 percent Forced Vital Capacity. His sister would like to see changes in trial criteria. Why should a patient have to give up a promising treatment to participate in research? Of course trials are controlled scientific studies but it can lead to very frustrated patients and families.

I too have had frustrations with clinical trials. Many of them exclude patients with feeding tubes. That makes me think that the drug being tested might not be available to patients with feeding tubes.

Cathy Collet, a patient fellow committee member, reported that neurologists are skeptical about Radicava’s efficacy because of the small clinical trial, but glad to have it in their tool bag. I am taking a break from Radicava treatment to sort out unwanted side effects or whatever is causing my sinus problem.

The next comment was from the daughter of an elderly ALS patient in Canada. She is frustrated by the lack of studies on geriatric patients, and the tools to explain feeding tubes and suction to an 88-year-old. She also has observed that weight loss and slurred speech in the elderly is usually attributed to stroke. Cathy Collet said there was no mention of diagnosis in the elderly, and that is near and dear to her heart because her mother was diagnosed in her 70’s. It is an issue that sorely needs to be addressed.

I am sorry that I was not able to attend but I am so appreciative of Jennifer and Cathy for sharing information.

Holidays, family and friends: love and connection

We spent Christmas with Stan’s dad and step mom, Cathy.  Stan left for Las Vegas five days before Andy and me. He drove down towing our RZR side by side in order to spend a few days taking his dad off road. His dad has loved hiking and getting out in the wild his whole life, but due to his health he has not been able to go out.

Stan texted me this photo and it was wonderful to see John out in the land he loves.

They had a great time for three days exploring the hills near Vegas.

Andy and I flew down Friday night after Andy finished finals. We had a nice visit. There are four dogs in that house and I was bothered by an allergy to the dog hair. I know I talk a lot about allergies in this blog, but with Bulbar ALS at the extent I have it, it is a big problem. I can’t swallow or cough or blow my nose. The week before Christmas I realized my symptoms were indicative of a sinus infection.  My awesome nurse practitioner called in a Zpac for me, and then a second one. And it was still with me.  So she called in Cipro for me. I started to feel better, but the intense dog allergy made it hard to know if the antibiotics were working.

Stan had a bout of food poisoning while we were in Vegas and was sick for a day. But for once he got sick and didn’t end up in the hospital. 

Andy helped Grandpa by picking all the ripe lemons off the tree in the back yard. They were posing for a photo, both holding handles on the bag when it broke.

On December 23, Stan’s step mom Cathy’s friend, Sandy, came over and we had a nice visit. 

Andy even played his viola for all of us.

Grandpa was a great music holder

Christmas was a nice gathering of my inlaws’ friends. The guests all were impressed with my text to speech app on my phone with my wireless keyboard and my Boogie Board too.  We shared stories and laughed. 

Stan gave me some gifts that will help me deal with my ALS. One is a charging cellphone case. I use my phone to speak so by mid afternoon my battery is already running low. I have tried external batteries but they are cumbersome and the charger connections don’t last long. Now I can charge overnight and both phone and case charge and in the morning the phone is charged and when the charge goes down the phone case takes over charging it. So my charge now lasts all day. It is wonderful. Another thing is a pill grinding syringe.

It has a grinding surface at the bottom of the syringe, so you can grind a pill or pills right in the syringe with the plunger. It works best to suck in some water and suspend the ground medication in an aqueous solution. Then it can go right into my stomach through my Mic-key Tube.

The day after Christmas we drove to Kingston, Nevada to visit our good friends, Ann and John, at Miles End Bed and Breakfast. This was the end of their Christmas brèak. They had just returned from Carson City that afternoon. We were the only guests and they brought pizza from Carson for dinner. That was fine because we were there as friends, not B&B guests. 

Long time friends Ann and Stan talking while Zee enjoys a Christmas present of dog biscuits.

But in the morning, Stan and Andy enjoyed John’s normal wonderful breakfast. Ann had to run off to work at the clinic, which she runs. So we packed up, said goodbye to John, and stopped by the clinic to say goodbye too Ann.

Andy drove us home and we got home mid afternoon.  We had to unpack, do laundry, and pack for another trip – this one to Hawai’i. But we were able to have dinner with my sister Cathy and Rick and 10-year-old Sam, visiting from Portland, Oregon. It was too bad that was all the time we had to visit. It was also too bad I was so tired I didn’t even take photos. But here is one they texted from San Francisco a few days later.

Then we flew to Hawai’i. I was worried about needing cough assist and suction on the long flight. But I went and talked to the flight attendants in the back and asked where I could do it. They asked if I could use the bathroom. I said no, too small. Then they offered me the back row of the plane (their seats) while they did beverage service. That worked out great because it was so loud back there that no one noticed me coughing with the cough assist or suctioning and both are loud.

Our niece who we raised lives on the Big Island and her son Oliver is 18 months old. We are his ‘grandparents’ and so proud of this handsome, smart boy (spoken like every grandmother😎).

Andy and Jonika have a bond closer than cousins. And Andy has a special bond with Ollie too.

We had a crazy surreal and funny dinner at a restaurant that will not be named. The waitress had real difficulty with our order, bringing the wrong things and totally forgetting one meal. But it was very fun and I was told the food that did come was great. 

Chris and Stan
Headstrong Ollie saying no to mom

Chris ended up getting his food to go. That led to jokes that may continue the whole trip – like ‘we could go back to that restaurant – but we might want to eat before we go!’

My morning view on December 31, 2017. The ocean is in the distance on the right.
New Year’s Eve 2017 (photo by Chris Grossi)

I had lots of love, connection, and hope in 2017 and I am looking forward to lots of the same in 2018 too. I hope you find the same.

Thanksgiving in the U.S. – what I am thankful for

Last Thursday, November 23, was Thanksgiving in the U.S. It is a traditional four day weekend but our local school district added the day before a few years ago, so now it’s a five day weekend. 

We drove to my sister Beth’s in California on Wednesday. She lives south of San Jose, in San Martin. My dad and stepmother, Anita, also drove from Reno. Beth and her husband Jamie have a beautiful home overlooking the CordeValle golf course and a vineyard. Jamie’s sons Phillip and Jack were there too. Because of not quite enough beds, Stan and I stayed at the golf club.

The view from our room.

We had a lovely Thanksgiving dinner at the club.

The beautiful menu – the food was equally beautiful. Jamie’s last name should have a capital B. That is the opposite problem from ours – the small d Macdonalds.

My dad, Phillip, Jamie, Jack, Beth, me, Stan, Andy, and Anita

Although I could not eat the turkey or any of the other wonderful food, I got into the turkey day spirit by drawing a turkey on my feeding tube. Thank you Laura Furumoto for the idea!

We went around the table and each said one thing we are thankful for. Among the comments: indoor plumbing, antibiotics, the first amendment, and the family we were sharing dinner with. Although it is hard to prioritize what I am thankful for, I said I am thankful to still be able self care after nearly two years with ALS. That is not just selfish because it impacts my son and husband greatly. I also seconded the comments about being thankful for everyone at that table. In addition, I am thankful for all of our relatives who we were not with on Thanksgiving.

I am thankful for my friends. Erika and her daughter Maddie came up from Eldorado Hills and spent Friday night and part of Saturday with us. Andy had to sell Christmas trees at his Boy Scout lot at Shoppers Square. Erika bought a tree and I bought a wreath. We will be with Stan’s dad and stepmother for Christmas so we don’t need a tree.

Marvelous Maddie with our wreath
Erika and Maddie with the tree on top of their car to drive over Donner Summit, with Andy and Cooper, who sold her the tree.

Erika even hung the wreath for me.

There are so many friends I am thankful for: the ones from my elementary school, the ones from high school, the ones from college and grad school, and all the friends I have met since I moved to Reno, and also the ones I met online that have become flesh and blood friends.

I am thankful for Radicava and the hope it brings for slower progression of my disease. I am thankful for all the researchers around the world who are working for an end to ALS. I am thankful for all the people who work in ALS clinics to help ALS patients have better quality of life. I am thankful for all the wonderful people with ALS and the wonderful caregivers I have met through ALS fundraisers, Facebook, and our local support group. I am thankful for the people who facilitate our support group.

I am thankful to be a patient fellow for the ALS/MND International Symposium in Boston December 8th through December 10th. I again encourage anyone with questions or comments about anything related to ALS/MND that you want the researchers to hear, please send me your questions and comments. I will be your voice at the conference. Again, you can comment on this blog or on Facebook or on Twitter.

I am also thankful for a fun Twitter interaction. The father of neurology is Jean-Martin Charcot, a brilliant doctor in the late 1800’s in France who first identified and classified ALS, MS and other neurological diseases. Well, Jean-Martin Charcot is on Twitter and he shared my blog! I could not agree more!

Halloween and the end of first round of Radicava 

As promised, I reprised my Beauty that Killed the Beast costume for Halloween, and this time got pictures.

Photos by Andy Macdonald

I had to make a little hole in the dress for my feeding tube so I can eat while wearing it. But since King Kong made such a mess of my dress anyway, the little hole was not noticable.

Our street gets filled with cars bringing kids from other neighborhoods. When the doorbell rings every few minutes there are about ten people each time on the porch. After running out of candy very early one year, we decided to never be home again. Luckily, our good friends Chuck and Alice have an annual Halloween party. Stan reprised his Parrot Head costume but Andy changed his up.

Andy got to trick or treat with the younger kids and he filled up a pillow case.

It was a great party with a little boy who dumped his candy on the floor and his dad went through it with him (classic!)

And Dad wanted to steal the candy (also classic!)

Calvin the little pirate was happy with his treasure.

Calvin’s sister Alana with her great grandparents
Doesn’t Alana look comfy with her great grandpa?

Alice had invited two other friends from aqua fitness, Marilyn and Mary. I was able to give them my update and tell them I will be back November 11.

Marilyn from aqua with Rita, Chuck and Alice’s daughter 

I miss my aqua fitness classes so much. They really do cover the range of motion. I had to take a month off after my port surgery which was on October 10. So on Saturday November 11, I will go back. I do my range of motion exercises home but it is not the same as an hour class in the water. And the first time I did the exercises at home was Nov. 2. I also have my ALS TDI Precision Medicine Program motion sensors that I wear for a week each month and have prescribed movements to do every other day and I started wearing them on Nov. 2. I am feeling it in my muscles but I know it is normal to feel sore when starting an exercise program. It is also scary because cramps and muscle soreness can be a sign of ALS progression. But I have to be ready for aqua fitness on October 11. Taking all this time off of exercise was not good for me. But I had plenty to keep me busy with the extra time.

The Patient Fellows and Committee for the ALS/MND International Symposium in Boston had a conference call where we each shared our interests in sessions we hope to attend. There is nice diversity among us so we won’t all be reporting on the same things. It will be tricky balancing attending all the sessions I am interested in with my energy level. 

Our dryer broke and I was able to call to arrange a service visit. I was home alone when the service guy came and I was able to deal with that using my Boogie Board. That hardly seems like a blog worthy event, but anytime I can handle things like this on my own seems like a victory now. 

We also went to a fun fundraiser for Reno High School. It included raffle, silent auction, buy a balloon for a guaranteed prize, and a live auction as well as sit down dinner. We had a fun table with friends from my work, other good friends, and new friends.

With Rene and Janet who I worked with. Photo by Stan Macdonald
Todd and Judy, my mala bracelet friend. Photo by Stan Macdonald
Justin and Suzi Champagne, new friends. Photo by Judy Harrison 
Photo by Judy Harrison

Also at our table were my friend Melissa, who was the photographer for the event, and her husband Charlie, who we met for the first time. The photographer is never in the photos. Sorry Melissa. I wish I had gotten one of you and Charlie.

As part of the live auction they auctioned off about 10 cakes from the Atlantis bakery. If your table bought a cake, that was your dessert. If not, you got cookies. Stan loves chocolate cake so he won the bid for our table.

Paying the winning bid for the cake. Photo by Judy Harrison 
Photo by Judy Harrison 

It was a fun evening supporting our son’s school. We also scored a silent auction item.

The Fly Away “basket” put together by Reno High staff, includes $200 in Southwest Airlines gift cards and all kinds of travel goodies in a nice travel bag. Photo by Sabine Beach

On November 2, Judy and I were going to go see the movie I’ll Push You about two friends who did the Camino de Santiago, and one was in a wheelchair so his best friend pushed him all the way. This was a fundraiser for MDA shown one night only all over the country. When we tried to get tickets it was sold out. But Judy decided to go anyway to see if she could get in. With my allergy symptoms, I did not want to go without a sure ticket. Stan’s cousin Lisa called and said she was in town so we met her at Great Basin for dinner. At 7 pm, Judy texted and said she got two free tickets and could I buzz down to the theater? But because we were out to dinner I could not hop in the car and go. I do hope to see it someday. Judy said the words love, connection, and hope were used many times in the movie 💜. She also said that the guy in the wheelchair was uncomfortable being cared for by others until he realized that helping was making his caregivers happy. That is a good thing for ALS patients to realize. My friend Sunny Brous (another blogger with ALS) shared this quote:

One of the secrets of life is that all that is really worth the doing is what we do for others. – Lewis Carroll

Last week I also completed Round 1 of my Radicava infusions.

Infusion #14 of Round 1

Now I get 14 days off. In the rest of the cycles I only have to do 10 of 14 days. So I will be able to do 5 on, 2 off, and 5 on then have 16 days off.

The weather forecast is showing the next three nights should have temperatures below freezing. I hope that this will be the end of my allergy season.

And finally, my online friend whose tagline was “I have ALS, ALS doesn’t have me,” passed away after over 10 years with ALS. Rest in peace Andre Williams, Sr. Your positivity and kindness will be missed.

A Step Back in Time, then a Giant Leap Forward

On a beautiful Saturday in October, we did something we have wanted to do for a long time. We rode the V&T Railway roundtrip from Carson City to Virginia City with friends.

There were plenty of characters dressed up to take us back over 150 years.

It was fun to look for wild horses and old mining facilities and it was also interesting to imagine traveling across the country by steam train.

A dog’s tail and leash between the seat and the back of the seat.

Andy met us in Virginia City because he had to go to cross country practice. We got him a one way ticket for the ride back.

Our gang with St. Mary’s in the Mountains Church in the background: Rita, Maddie, Paul, Alice, Andy, Stan, Chuck, and David
The steam engine chugging away after dropping us off. Photo credit Andy Macdonald
4th Ward School. Photo credit Andy Macdonald

We hiked uphill to lunch at Cafe del Rio. There was a zombie group scavenger hunt going on so it was nice to be on the south side of town. Most of the competitors were in costume but not many looked like zombies. There were a lot of people running around though. After lunch we toured the Chollar Mine. The guide had interesting facts about the mining industry in Virginia City since the 1860’s.

Paul and Maddie in front of the mine entrance. Photo credit Andy Macdonald

After the mine tour, Stan and I had had enough walking and I had enough pollen, so we walked back and sat in the train car with all the other old tired folks.😕 The rest of the group hiked back up to C Street for ice cream. 

Andy enjoyed the train ride back down to Carson City. When we got back to Carson we all parted ways and Andy rode with us to drive back up to Virginia City to get his truck. Even with my allergies it was a really fun day.

Now we will stop in present day for a moment. It was time for my three month feeding tube change and my sweet and funny husband changed it for me.

Now the giant leap into the future: I finally started the first new drug for ALS in 20 years. I call this a giant leap into the future because there are so many promising new drugs in trial or close to trial, so future ALS patients should have treatment options.

Radicava in my hands finally! Photo credit Alice Hilsabeck

We got approved to start home infusions with only one training session because Stan was an EMT. And our friend Alice is a retired nurse and she is willing to be the backup.

Five days of Radicava that would be coming home with us.
I am so lucky to have my wonderful husband and friend willing to help with this.

Our Option Care nurse, Pamela, was an excellent trainer. She explained everything and instructed us in the need for sterility since the drug is going into my Vena Cava through my port. She placed the infusion needle in my port and I was ready to go. Stan learned how to do the infusion.

This and all remaining photos credit Alice Hilsabeck

I am so happy to finally be on this drug. The reported 30 % reduction in progression of ALS is huge. The only other drug for ALS available before this only extends life for a few months. 

For all United States ALS patients still waiting to start, I recommend that you be your own advocate. Call your nurse educator. Call Searchlight Patient Support and ask for your patient ID number and your case number. Then ask to talk to your case manager for the status of your approval. You also may have to call your insurance company, your neurologist’s office, and the infusion company. Make sure that you tell everyone that every day makes a difference in this disease. The local infusion company wanted me to wait until next Wednesday to start three required days of training. But we asked if there was any way to start sooner, for instance, could I come in to their facility? And the answer  was, “Yes, tomorrow.” Woo hoo! The pharmacist did call Stan to talk with him and verify his training. 

Love of friends and family, connection with friends, family, and medical professionals, and hope that this drug will allow me to see my son become a man and allow me to be around for the next ALS drug that comes along –  potentially halting or reversing the disease. Let’s hope.


Party, Progess and Plans

Andy went backpacking with Boy Scouts from Mt. Rose Highway to Spooner Lake on the Tahoe Rim Trail. Both Stan and I would have loved to go along but our backpacking days are over. Thankfully one of the dads who went along took photos.

Photos by Shane Sykes

Andy had fun and he said it was beautiful – that is Lake Tahoe behind him. He left Saturday morning and got back Sunday afternoon.

We left Sunday morning and flew to Las Vegas for Stan’s dad’s birthday party. I was looking forward to no pat down going through security because I already had breakfast, and all my food was in my checked luggage. But I learned that my wireless keyboard and Boogie Board now count as electronics bigger than a cell phone that must be taken out. Maybe someday I can get through without the time consuming and personal space invading extra search.

When we arrived, Stan’s brother Scott and his granddaughter Lillee were already there from Grand Junction, Colorado. Cathy, Stan’s stepmom, and Lillee were in the pool.

Stan’s dad, John, enjoying a visit with his sons, Scott and Stan.
Everyone listening to John.

John loves to talk and you can find out interesting things from him, like this family story I had not heard before: Stan’s grandfather was a pharmacist in Texas and he dated Bonnie of Bonnie and Clyde before she met Clyde. John said his dad had a photo of himself with Bonnie Parker and he thinks he now has it and will look for it. We are all lucky that Clyde came along and snatched Bonnie away because Mac moved on to Kansas and fell in love with Olive, who worked in his pharmacy, and Olive was the nicest person you could ever meet (Stan’s grandmother).

I took a little nap and then went in the pool with Lillers, as I call her. She is going into 4th grade. We had so much fun. There were wasps coming out of the bushes and Lillers would use the pool net to catch them and hold them under the water for a long time before they would drown. We devised a signal for wasp since I can’t talk. If I saw one I held up three fingers to make a W for wasp. She was quite good at catching them. She is a great swimmer and showed me some of her tricks. Then we played Ninja Warrior. There were two floats, two noodles, and two pool weights. She would have to run across moving floats or run across both floats and pick up the weights or jump over a noodle the long way on top of the floats. Another challenge was to jump into an oval formed by the two noodles. It was quite fun to play like that with a delightful girl. Love you Lillers!

The next morning, John’s birthday, we had to say goodbye to Scott and and Lillee, but not before family photos. Stan’s sister Terry had arrived the night before so at least all three kids were there on the morning of John’s birthday.

After they left to drive back to Colorado, Terry had a dental appointment so we dropped her off and John and Stan and I drove around delivering postcards from the hand delivery post office in the Galapagos. When we were in the Galapagos at the post office barrel, our guide took out the pile of postcards and read the destinations. We grabbed one from the Reno area and took 4 from the Vegas area knowing we would be visiting. It turns out the 4 cards were from the same family. At the first house the woman was painting her house and didn’t want her picture taken. She told us that 14 members of her family went on their Galapagos cruise on a small boat called the Darwin. She finally agreed to have her hand in the photo.

At the second one, I was prepared to talk, but no one was home.

We decided it would be better to leave the postcard sticking out under the door mat.

The last two postcards were for the same address. A teenage boy answered the door. When he heard why we were there he was excited and said, “Mom come here, our postcards from the Galapagos!” Mom came to the door and said, “We were just talking about how the people had to go each house to deliver the mail.” She was the sister of the house painter and would not be in the photo either but the teenage son was willing.

John said he enjoyed driving to parts of the town he had not seen before.  He also gave us a tour of the OLLI (Osher Lifelong Learning Institute), where he and Cathy spend a lot of time teaching. We finished our tour just in time to pick up Terry.


That evening we went to Bahama Breeze for John’s 86th birthday party. About 30 of his friends attended. The restaurant was decorated very nicely with tropical art and seat covers with turtles, fish, or palm trees. The first thing Terry and I did was explore the place and take a selfie:

The birthday boy with his son and daughter.
Cathy and John at the conclusion of a very nice party.

Terry drove us to the airport for our 10 pm flight. I had a momentary panic when I couldn’t find my license. I finally found it in a pocket of my purse. Again I was hoping to sail through security without my food. I dutifully removed my wireless keyboard and Boogie Board. But in the arms up scanner they saw my necklace and the clasps on my bra, resulting in invasive pat down again! Our flight was delayed 45 minutes, meaning we arrived in Reno at midnight rather than 11:15. That meant that on Tuesday I was moving very slow. But it was totally worth it for the family love and fun.


I have been waiting for the newly approved drug Radicava, which is already available. We finally made some progress – confirmed that I am in the system so the benefits investigation can start, got a call from the infusion supplier which is the same as my food supplier, and got a call from the Nurse Educator who will be working with me for the first 9 months on the drug. It may still be a few weeks before I start, but the ball is finally rolling.


We will be traveling up to the total solar eclipse in SW Idaho or SE Oregon on Monday with dear friends. We will stay at my friend Erika’s parents’ house with Erika, Paul, their daughter Maddie, as well as John and Thien. Paul and John work for the company Stan retired from, but in the Sacramento area. We have all become very good friends. I look forward to meeting Erika’s parents and add them to my list of friends. All 3 families have high school or college boys not able to join us.

I am posting this on Friday instead of Monday because it is quite possible that cell phone networks will be overloaded with the hordes of people that flock to Total Eclipses. You can read about it here a week from Monday.

You flew you Lear Jet up to Nova Scotia, to see the total eclipse of the sun – from You’re so Vain by Carly Simon.